Police officer – NYPD Holy Name http://nypdholyname.com/ Sat, 14 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nypdholyname.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-47-120x120.png Police officer – NYPD Holy Name http://nypdholyname.com/ 32 32 In the Loop: Ex West Auckland police officer on gun violence https://nypdholyname.com/in-the-loop-ex-west-auckland-police-officer-on-gun-violence/ Sat, 14 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/in-the-loop-ex-west-auckland-police-officer-on-gun-violence/ “Gun violence was very common in West Auckland…it’s starting to become the norm,” said a former police officer. Photo/NZME A West Auckland cop who recently left the force says gun violence is becoming the ‘norm’ and some officers’ anxiety is ‘skyrocketing’. The former officer, who was only with the force for four years, told the […]]]>

“Gun violence was very common in West Auckland…it’s starting to become the norm,” said a former police officer. Photo/NZME

A West Auckland cop who recently left the force says gun violence is becoming the ‘norm’ and some officers’ anxiety is ‘skyrocketing’.

The former officer, who was only with the force for four years, told the Herald’s In the Loop podcast that “gun jobs” had increased during his time in the field, but calls for family were their daily “bread and butter”.

“Gun violence was very prevalent in West Auckland…it’s starting to become the norm,” he said.

“You sometimes feel in danger.”

Earlier this year, the Herald revealed that police in the line of duty had discovered more than 10,000 firearms in the past three years. This data showed that the police owned an average of about 10 firearms per day.

The 25-year-old said that when he was an officer it was scary to know that one day he might be at an incident where there was a gun.

“It goes hand in hand with gangs, instead of being an affair or a fight in the street, it’s now someone brought a gun.”

The former officer was working the day Constable Matthew Hunt was tragically shot dead by a gang member during a routine traffic stop in West Auckland in June 2020.

Hunt’s murder shocked the nation. The 28-year-old was the first time a New Zealand officer had died in the line of duty since 2009.

In the aftermath, the man’s station was rocked “dramatically” and that left many people unable to get to work.

“No one had been to anything like that. It was really hard to watch the station go empty. We weren’t sure if it was just a one-off or something we just had to get used to.

“My anxiety was on the rise, the pressure was on,” he said.

The former cop, pro-general arming, left the front line shortly after Hunt’s death to work in the Family Offenses Unit before deciding to quit the force.

He said the pressures of being a young officer as well as the growing number of high profile jobs were among the reasons he left the force.

“No one brings a knife anymore, everyone brings a gun.

“A knife I can handle, but a gun I can’t stop.”

He said the police didn’t want to shoot because it was ‘awful’ to fire even one shot, but said: ‘I find it difficult to criticize the person or the police who shoot when they don’t know all the facts, and neither have you been in that situation where you’re being handed a knife or a gun.

“They don’t know what that situation looks like when you’re in a hallway and there are bullets attacking you.”

The former officer said the police did not shoot to kill, but to incapacitate.

“No one brings a knife anymore; everyone brings a gun,” the former West Auckland Police offer reads. Photo/NZME

A police report last year after Hunt’s death noted that evidence indicated that routine arming of police could increase public safety risks and the number of people shot, rather than improve police and public safety.

“It is inconclusive as to whether this would make our staff safer,” the report said.

Last year, a biennial NielsenIQ survey of nearly 6,000 Police Association members found 73% support for general arming of the police, the highest level in a decade.

The survey found that one in four general duty officers were threatened with a firearm in 2020, and one in eight officers overall were threatened with a firearm.

Police Association President Chris Cahill echoed those numbers, but admitted that arming police would come with risks and would require considerable increased training.

“We would much rather and our members would much rather see the threat of guns reduced so that they don’t need to be armed.”

Chris Cahill, chairman of the NZ Police Association, in his office in Wellington.  Photo/Mark Mitchell
Chris Cahill, chairman of the NZ Police Association, in his office in Wellington. Photo/Mark Mitchell

An RNZ survey this year found New Zealand police are killing 11 times the rate of police in England and Wales.

RNZ reported that most of those shot by police are Maori, reflecting the fact that police use of all types of force – including firearms, tasers and batons – is directed disproportionately against young Maori men.

Maori men between the ages of 17 and 40 made up just 3% of New Zealand’s population but accounted for 34% of police use of force incidents, he said.

This report says that New Zealand police have killed 39 people since 1990, while police in England and Wales have killed 77 people during this period – twice as many as in New Zealand but in a population more than 10 times greater than ours.

Cahill said these statistics cannot be ignored, but the underlying cause must be examined.

“I can think of two big differences from other jurisdictions. One is that the police are generally unarmed, a lot of offenders are surprised when they confront a police officer with a gun. In Australia you know a cop has a gun on their hip, so you’re much less likely to approach a cop in a situation that might get you shot.”

“The second issue is the prevalence of guns and the availability of guns in New Zealand. We have been compared to the UK on the number of police shootings, but the reality in the UK is that it is incredibly hard to get a gun.”

In the Loop is a podcast from the NZ Herald.

• In the Loop is available on iHeartRadio, Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes are released every Friday morning.

• You can find more New Zealand Herald podcasts at nzherald.co.nz/podcasts or iHeartRadio.

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EFCC indicts lawyer and six others for allegedly robbing deceased police officer https://nypdholyname.com/efcc-indicts-lawyer-and-six-others-for-allegedly-robbing-deceased-police-officer/ Sat, 14 May 2022 06:35:36 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/efcc-indicts-lawyer-and-six-others-for-allegedly-robbing-deceased-police-officer/ The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) Uyo Zone Command has indicted Barrister Samuel Ebitu alongside six others, for allegedly stealing the sum of N13,171,415.25 from the account of a deceased policeman. They were arraigned before Federal High Court Judge Agatha Okeke sitting in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State on two counts bordering on conspiracy, forgery […]]]>

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) Uyo Zone Command has indicted Barrister Samuel Ebitu alongside six others, for allegedly stealing the sum of N13,171,415.25 from the account of a deceased policeman.

They were arraigned before Federal High Court Judge Agatha Okeke sitting in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State on two counts bordering on conspiracy, forgery and obtaining by false pretence.

The other six are: Etimbuk Godwin Edet, Michael Jeremiah Isong, Sunny Isong, Godwin Ekanem, Emmanuel Jackson Isong and Harrison Ofuomah Emamoke.

Specifically, the widow of a late Chief Superintendent of Police, Godwin Edet Umoren, filed a petition against the defendants for allegedly embezzling the said sum of money from her late husband’s account.

Also read: EFCC indicts lawyer for land fraud

One of the counts read: “That you Etimbuk Godwin Edet, Michael Jeremiah Isong, Sunny Isong, Godwin Ekanem, Emmanuel Jackson Isong, Harrison Ofuomah Emamoke, Samuel Ebitu in September 2020 in Uyo within the jurisdiction of this honorable court with intent to defraud, have conspired between you to commit a crime namely: obtaining money by false pretense by inducing the United Bank for Africa Plc (UBA) to confer a benefit in the amount of 13,171,415, 25 naira (thirteen million one hundred and seventy-one thousand, four hundred and fifteen naira, twenty-five kobo only) on a single Sunny Isong (3rd defendant), a sum which was withdrawn from the account of the late CSP Godwin Edet Umoren, domiciled at United Bank for Africa Plc (UBA), on the pretext that you knew to be false and thereby committed an offense contrary to section 8(a) of the Advance Charges Fraud and Other Fraud Related Offenses Act 2006 and punishable under under Article 1 (3) of the same law”.

All seven defendants pleaded “not guilty” to the charges brought against them by the EFCC, and given their pleas, EFCC lawyer Adebayo Soares begged the court for a trial date and for the defendants be returned to the Nigeria Correctional Centre.

Judge Okeke then adjourned the case until May 24, 25 and 26, 2022 for hearing, while the defendants were remanded to the Nigerian Uyo Correctional Centre.

According to EFCC media and publicity chief Wilson Uwujaren, investigations into the case revealed that lawyer Samuel Ebitu allegedly conspired with other defendants to obtain a probate registry administration letter. , Akwa Ibom State Judiciary, which they used to embezzle the sum of 13,171,415.25 naira (thirteen million one hundred seventy-one thousand four hundred and fifteen naira, twenty-five kobo), through the 3rd accused, Sunny Isong, who claimed to be the only surviving brother of the deceased.

They were then arrested at different locations in Akwa Ibom State and brought to justice.

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The Chief Assistant Assessor facing the Pocatello Police Officer in Bannock’s Senior Assessor https://nypdholyname.com/the-chief-assistant-assessor-facing-the-pocatello-police-officer-in-bannocks-senior-assessor/ Wed, 11 May 2022 17:13:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/the-chief-assistant-assessor-facing-the-pocatello-police-officer-in-bannocks-senior-assessor/ POCATELLO — With current Bannock County Assessor Sheri Davies not running for re-election, her deputy chief has filed for the position. Anita Hymas, who has served as the county’s chief deputy evaluator since 2013, will face current Pocatello police officer Greg Cates in the Republican primary. EastIdahoNews.com sent the same eight questions to both candidates […]]]>

POCATELLO — With current Bannock County Assessor Sheri Davies not running for re-election, her deputy chief has filed for the position.

Anita Hymas, who has served as the county’s chief deputy evaluator since 2013, will face current Pocatello police officer Greg Cates in the Republican primary.

EastIdahoNews.com sent the same eight questions to both candidates but only received answers from Hymas. His unedited answers below had to be 250 words or less.

The primary election will take place on May 17. The general election will take place on November 8.

Tell us about yourself – include information about your family, career, education, volunteer work and any previous public service experience.

HYMAS: I moved to Idaho when I was 9. My dad retired from the military and took us to Idaho. We lived in northern Idaho until 1977 when we moved to Bannock County. I completed my junior and senior years at Pocatello High School.

Through a class called Office Professions, I was able to apply for and get a job at the county assessor’s office, working in the set room looking for the property for the second half of the day. After graduating, I attended ISU while continuing to work part-time. I was quickly offered a full-time job in the assessor’s office.

I have been married for 38 years and we have a daughter who is the light of our life. We have resided in Chubbuck since 1987. We love the outdoors and love Bannock County. I am active in my church and have been a Special Olympics swim coach for years.

At the county, I started out as a researcher and quickly learned to process deeds, eventually doing mobile home data entry. I was Office Manager, then I returned to the flat room where I learned to write on the computer rather than by hand. I then became Cadastral Coordinator, which was one of my favorite positions.

In 2013, the assessor at the time, Dave Packer, appointed me chief deputy and I have been able to remain in this position ever since.

What accomplishments are you most proud of in your personal life or career?

HYMAS: On a personal level, my greatest achievement is becoming a wife and mother. Another is that I overcame a fear of water when my husband asked me to try float tubing. Now it’s one of my favorite activities.

On a professional level, here are some of my accomplishments: I can fill most positions in the office. I never became a chartered appraiser, but I took all the necessary courses. I work with evaluators to resolve issues and get things done in a timely manner. As a dish room assistant and deed processor, I learned to find any deed or case that no one else could find. I helped create dish room procedures to go digital with dish books when we first converted to computers. As a Mobile Home Technician, I worked with the Treasurer’s Office to create a prepayment form for pre-payment of taxes for manufactured homes. As Office Manager, I created procedures and processes for support staff. As Chief Deputy, I made improvements to the process for processing non-profit exemptions, which is now done in the Commissioner’s office. I have been instrumental in improving the appeals process in our office alongside assessors and support staff.

My greatest accomplishment is to have worked and evolved in an office that not only became my career, but an office that I helped evolve into the future.

Why are you a member of the Republican/Democratic/Independent/Other party? Briefly explain your political platform.

HYMAS: I was raised in a conservative Republican household. My grandparents and my parents were all Republicans. My father, being in the army and having served in 3 wars, loved his country. He instilled in me and my two brothers patriotism and a love of our country. I was taught at a very young age good values ​​and strong morals and I was taught how precious life is. I thank both my parents for the things they taught us. I believe in the 2nd Amendment to protect our freedom. I believe in God and I know he lives.

I have always been interested in politics since I was young. I was so excited at the age of 18 to exercise my right to vote. I don’t think I’ve ever voted in a primary or general election.

Please explain the role and responsibilities of the position you are applying for?

HYMAS: The primary duty of the appraiser is to determine the fair values ​​of real and personal property. Each taxable parcel must be reduced to its market value each year. This is done through the revaluation process by observing the market and reviewing sales data.

The assessor, per Idaho code, is responsible for completing a 5-year assessment cycle that requires at least 1/5 of the county to be reviewed and inspected for any changes each year. They are also responsible for identifying and classifying all county property according to state law. The appraiser is also responsible for implementing exemptions on real and personal property.

The appraiser is also responsible for the Department of Motor Vehicles, titling and registering vehicles as an agent of the Idaho Department of Transportation.

What are the biggest challenges facing your country

HYMAS: The growth we are seeing is incredible in Bannock County. That being said, the biggest challenge for the assessor’s office is that the Bannock County real estate market is unrecognizable from 4 years ago. Homes are selling above asking price and first-time home buyers face a monumental challenge in the dream of home ownership.

Combine that with the state requirement that each county must appraise properties at current market value every year and we have quite the dilemma. Adjusting properties to match this market, while doing it fairly and equitably, is a big project. We’ve made great strides toward that goal over the past two years, and that work continues as we speak. I will work tirelessly to provide taxpayers with the fair assessments they demand.

How will you best represent the views of your constituents, even those with different political views?

HYMAS: The office of assessor is a partisan elected position, but honestly, I don’t think partisan politics is really part of how the office works. The state has laws, codes, rules, etc. quite simple about how the appraiser’s office does its job.

I have worked with people from all walks of life and from all political backgrounds, and will continue to do so. I believe that many of the problems we face today can be solved by involving a diverse group of people with different backgrounds and experiences. In all these years of working with the public, I have learned far more from our landowners and ratepayers than I could ever hope to teach them. Many of my ideas are based on feedback and conversations I regularly have with members of our community.

How can you encourage or improve relationships with cities and other municipal or educational entities in your jurisdiction?

HYMAS: Communication. By far, the best way to help each other and develop our relationships is to talk to each other. By listening to each other’s needs and finding solutions together, we move forward as a government and as a community.

What are your views on local and national media organizations. As an elected official, how would you work with the media to help inform the public?

HYMAS: I think the media has a very difficult job: bringing the news to people and doing it in an engaging way. I look forward to doing whatever I can to help give the media information that they can then pass on to the public. There are many one-on-one conversations I’ve had with the audience that contained information that would likely be appreciated by a larger audience. By working with the media, we can help get these important messages to as many people as possible.

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Police Constable Jobs – Firestone Police Department https://nypdholyname.com/police-constable-jobs-firestone-police-department/ Tue, 10 May 2022 19:05:24 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/police-constable-jobs-firestone-police-department/ Summary The police officer is a security-critical position that is involved in the complex and specialized activities necessary to maintain civil order, preserve public peace, protect life and property, detecting and preventing crime, apprehending criminals, knowing and enforcing the law. laws and ordinances. Each leader will be held to a high level of performance within […]]]>

Summary

The police officer is a security-critical position that is involved in the complex and specialized activities necessary to maintain civil order, preserve public peace, protect life and property, detecting and preventing crime, apprehending criminals, knowing and enforcing the law. laws and ordinances. Each leader will be held to a high level of performance within this structure. The police officer reports to a sergeant, and senior tenured officers may serve as temporary shift supervisors in the sergeant’s absence.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

The list below is intended to illustrate the responsibilities of the position and is not exhaustive. The City may modify these functions at any time.

  • Regularly patrols the entire community, performs complex investigations, renders services, enforces traffic and criminal laws, and generally ensures public safety
  • Patrols school zones and performs routine business checks
  • Attend city functions to stay connected to the community
  • Performs first aid and first aid, as part of training, when necessary
  • Responds to calls regarding public disturbances, complaints, criminal, civil or emergency situations, provides emergency medical assistance, if needed
  • Enforces traffic laws, vehicle codes and promotes road safety, notes illegal or unsafe driving practices and advises or makes arrests as appropriate. Investigate accidents, direct traffic, report unsafe road conditions, and otherwise promote vehicle and pedestrian safety
  • Detects and prevents criminal activity by monitoring commercial and residential areas, investigates suspicious activity and takes action to prevent criminal action, promotes crime prevention by establishing contact with businesses and residents, including explaining laws applicable, seeking cooperation in reporting crimes and building good relationships. with the citizens
  • Stay alert to stolen property and wanted or missing persons
  • Provides code enforcement and animal control activities as needed, issues appropriate citations and takes immediate action to mitigate issues and disputes
  • Processes suspects and performs appropriate computer searches to investigate criminal history prior to release, may transport suspects to detention centers if necessary
  • Investigate, protect and preserve crime scenes and assist other officers, protect evidence, take witness statements and assist detectives in specialized investigations, follow up on cases, may photograph and/or draw crime scenes and accidents
  • Communicates effectively with fellow officers or other law enforcement agencies to assist in the suppression of crime or the apprehension of criminals and the recovery of stolen property
  • Interacts effectively with other jurisdictions, law enforcement agencies and courts
  • Thoroughly prepares written reports and memoranda summarizing information
  • Testifies professionally in court regarding police duties and works with prosecutors, must be a credible witness
  • May lead or assist in in-depth investigations involving crimes or other serious offenses and work closely with district attorneys regarding cases
  • Complies with department policies, rules, regulations, instructions, statutes, and ordinances, as well as general policing literature, analyzes and interprets legal codes and criminal evidence

Takes proper safety precautions to prevent accidents, is responsible for own safety, others, materials and equipment, uses all required safety equipment and follows all safety regulations, policies and procedures, reports all accidents and damage to City property

Responsible for ensuring proper maintenance, service and cleanliness of assigned patrol unit and all assigned equipment

Responsible for knowing the names and general locations of streets, hospitals, public buildings, government agencies and important commercial establishments in the city

Responsible for obtaining and maintaining training and certifications applicable to the department

· May be assigned to other responsibilities, to include; Field Training Officer, School Resource Officer, SWAT, K9, or Instructor for a variety of police continuing education programs

· May assume the role of shift supervisor in the absence of a sergeant with the prior authorization of the Chief of Police or his delegate. Police officers must pass a standardized supervisory test and internal examination by the Chief of Police and/or his delegate prior to any supervisory assignment

Knowledge, skills and abilities:

To perform this job successfully, a person must be able to perform each essential task satisfactorily. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable people with disabilities to perform essential functions. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skills and/or abilities required:

· Public safety and security: knowledge of the rules and regulations relating to the protection of persons, data and property; including the use of arms and force

Law and Government: knowledge of statutes, criminal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process

Psychology: knowledge of basic human behavior and performance, including individual differences in ability, personality, learning and motivation

Knowledge of community policing techniques and programs

Knowledge of emergency medical practices and first aid

· Mechanical/technical: proficient in the safe operation of various equipment; including driving motor vehicles in dangerous situations, using computers, radios, weapons and other police equipment

Ability to act effectively in crisis situations

· Active listening: able to listen to what others are saying and ask appropriate questions

· Service Orientation: Skilled at actively seeking ways to help people, interacting tactfully and effectively with citizens in a wide variety of stressful situations

· Critical thinking: ability to use logic and analysis to identify strengths and weaknesses of different approaches

Social perception: ability to be aware of other people’s reactions and understand why they react the way they do

· Ability to make oral presentations

· Ability to read and interpret documents, such as safety rules, operating and maintenance instructions, and procedure manuals

Ability to add, subtract, multiply or divide quickly

· Ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so that others understand, including writing reports according to predefined formats

· Ability to simultaneously use oral language, social acumen and reasoning skills to conduct effective interviews

  • Ability to perform essential tasks with autonomy and initiative
  • Ability to work effectively with administrative or investigative staff on directed assignments

· Ability to pass a medical physical examination and drug screening

Education and experience:

A high school diploma or high school diploma is required

Sixty (60) semester hours at an accredited college or university is preferred

Ability to learn and then demonstrate knowledge of department policy and procedures, city personnel policies, municipal code, and state and federal law enforcement laws is required

Licenses/certifications:

Colorado Post certification is required

Must possess and maintain a valid Colorado driver’s license and a safe driving record for continued employment

Physical activity:

The work environment characteristics and physical demands described herein are representative of those an employee may encounter in performing the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable people with disabilities to perform essential functions.

The noise level in the work environment is generally moderate with periods of increased noise.

The employee must frequently lift and/or move up to 50 pounds. Specific vision abilities required for this job include close vision, peripheral vision, and the ability to adjust focus. In the performance of his duties, the employee is regularly required to sit down, to use his hands to touch, handle or smell, speak or hear. The employee often has to reach out with hands and arms. The employee must often stand, walk, stoop or kneel. Frequent driving of a variety of motor vehicles is required. The employee must be available and on call at different times.

++Body movement:++

Walk, stand, bend, climb and sit while performing your duties. Repetitive hand motion when typing and writing.

++Vision:++

Uses sight in the normal range with or without correction to perform its tasks.

++Hearing:++

Uses hearing within the normal range with or without correction to perform tasks.

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California second best state to be a police officer https://nypdholyname.com/california-second-best-state-to-be-a-police-officer/ Mon, 09 May 2022 15:57:33 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/california-second-best-state-to-be-a-police-officer/ The best and worst states in 2022 to be a police officer With President Joe Biden’s State of the Union address calling on the nation to “defund the police” with better training and resources, personal finance website WalletHub today released its report on the best and the worst states in 2022 to be a police […]]]>

The best and worst states in 2022 to be a police officer

With President Joe Biden’s State of the Union address calling on the nation to “defund the police” with better training and resources, personal finance website WalletHub today released its report on the best and the worst states in 2022 to be a police officer.

To determine the best states to pursue a career in law enforcement or to be a police officer, WalletHub compared all 50 states and the District of Columbia across 30 key police-friendliness indicators. The dataset ranges from median income of law enforcement officers to police deaths per 1,000 officers to national and local police protection spending per capita.

Here is a snapshot of the life and work of a police officer in California (1=best; 25=average):

  • 13th – Median income of law enforcement officers (adjusted for cost of living)
  • 20th – % of homicide cases solved
  • 3rd – National and local police protection expenditure per capita
  • 11th – Police deaths per 1,000 officers
  • 27 – Road safety

Note: “Law Enforcement Officers” include police and sheriff patrollers, detectives and criminal investigators.
Expert commentary on law enforcement

What is the long-term outlook for the law enforcement field?

“As an optimist, I tend to think that it always gets darker before dawn. I think the field and the profession will continue to evolve as our society evolves. law enforcement are learning organizations, but at times and in many communities/jurisdictions they can be lagging organizations.It will take a sustained and concerted effort from community residents, coupled with law enforcement professionals. law enforcement and policy makers, to co-create the policies and practices needed to improve the field and improve the well-being of the community.
— Brian N. Williams, Ph.D. – Associate Professor, University of Virginia

“The field will face many challenges in the years to come. Many police departments already struggle to recruit, train and retain qualified candidates. Many qualified people opt for other employment opportunities in the public or private sectors which are less stressful and often more lucrative. The policing profession as a whole has come under intense scrutiny in recent years, which means agencies need recruits with a wider range of talents, skills and qualifications. In other words, recruitment standards have risen at a time when it is more difficult to recruit qualified people.
— William H. Sousa, Ph.D. – Professor and Director, Center for Crime and Justice Policy and NVSAC – University of Nevada, Las Vegas

What steps should the police take to improve community relations, especially in minority communities?

“Fundamentally, it must be understood that it will take more than a few ministerial initiatives and hyped social media campaigns to improve the strained relationship between the police and minority communities. However, that does not mean that nothing should be done. Law enforcement officers need to do a better job of integrating with the communities they police, which will increase legitimacy and decrease the perception of an adversarial relationship between the two sides. Additionally, there must be a willingness to admit the historical and contemporary wrongs of law enforcement. In addition to acknowledging that police have enforced immoral laws throughout American history, contemporary police voices should be most prominent in speaking out against the behavior of officers who engage in misconduct. The reluctance to report police misconduct only confirms the most negative perceptions of the profession.
— Chidike I. Okeem, Ph.D. – Assistant Professor, Western New England University

“First, rather than just studying what police do wrong in communities of color and/or poor communities, we also need to study what they do right in middle and upper class communities. For example, why are there fewer complaints about excessive police use of force in upper-class communities? If we find out what works in some communities, we may be able to apply those lessons in other communities. Then we need to hire people who understand the history and realities of policing, and how that history has affected public perceptions of policing…I don’t just mean hire more women, people of color, and people who identify as LGBTQ+. I also mean that we have to hire people who see the police as a public service and who are aware of what they represent in communities of color.
— Tracy L. Tamborra, Ph.D. – Professor, University of New Haven

What strategies have proven effective in diversifying the police force so that it is more representative of the community?

“If a police service wants to hire a diverse set of officers, it needs to make that a priority. This involves conducting an internal audit of an agency’s demographics and looking at who gets hired, who gets promoted, and who runs an agency. Departments should actively promote their goals with diversity initiatives. An agency should publicize its successes in this area and publicize its long-term diversity goals. Hiring practices should focus on “screening” not eliminating candidates…Police services can also benefit from hiring officers who speak multiple languages ​​and have unique cultural backgrounds.
— Zachary A. Powell, Ph.D. – Assistant Professor, California State University, San Bernardino

“The truth is that no department has identified an effective and consistent strategy to achieve sustainable diversity within its ranks, but many are trying hard. Some departments are expanding their reach through social media efforts; others push for incentives such as educational opportunities or bonuses to attract potential recruits; and others are still reviewing hiring policies that disproportionately exclude minority applicants, such as rules that make people ineligible for employment because of previous marijuana use. Many of these initiatives are recent, so we still don’t know how effective they will be, but the fact that so many departments are paying real attention to this issue is significant.
— Jorge X. Camacho – Clinical Lecturer and Policy Director of the Justice Collaboratory, Yale Law School

For the full report, please click here.

Image Sources

  • Peace Officers: Shutterstock
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US ex-cop poses as wedding guest to steal gifts – News https://nypdholyname.com/us-ex-cop-poses-as-wedding-guest-to-steal-gifts-news/ Sat, 07 May 2022 03:40:02 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/us-ex-cop-poses-as-wedding-guest-to-steal-gifts-news/ He said he attended weddings to hear wedding vows ‘because he was going through a divorce’ By AP Published: Sat. 7 May 2022, 07:40 Last update: Sat. 7 May 2022, 07:45 A retired sheriff’s deputy posed as a guest at two Phoenix-area weddings to steal boxes of cards containing thousands of dollars, and is being […]]]>

He said he attended weddings to hear wedding vows ‘because he was going through a divorce’



By AP

Published: Sat. 7 May 2022, 07:40

Last update: Sat. 7 May 2022, 07:45

A retired sheriff’s deputy posed as a guest at two Phoenix-area weddings to steal boxes of cards containing thousands of dollars, and is being investigated for a series of crimes similar, authorities said on Friday.

Landon Earl Rankin, 54, was arrested Wednesday for robberies from private locations in April and was being held without bond, according to Chandler police and court and jail records.

According to police, the two boxes of stolen wedding cards each contained between $3,000 and $6,000.

Rankin was a deputy in the Pinal County Sheriff’s Office, joining the agency in 1994. He retired in 2015 but remained a reserve officer until 2017, office spokeswoman Lauren Reimer said.

Rankin was jailed on two counts of burglary. He was also convicted of multiple offenses of possession of drugs and drug paraphernalia because he had amphetamine and fentanyl on him when he was arrested, police said.

Court records did not mention a lawyer who could speak on his behalf.

Surveillance video from one of Chandler’s wedding venues showed Rankin grabbing the gift box, placing it in a bag, exiting the back door of the venue, running to his vehicle and driving away, police said in a probable cause statement.

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When questioned by police, Rankin said he attended weddings to hear wedding vows “because he was in the process of getting a divorce,” the statement said.

During their investigation of the two Chandler robberies, police learned of at least seven similar crimes in other Phoenix-area jurisdictions, Sgt. Chandler police spokesman Jason McClimans.

Rankin is currently being investigated in those cases, and Chandler police have heard from “four or five” additional newlywed couples about possible additional thefts, McClimans said.

Police have urged victims of such crimes to contact appropriate law enforcement.

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Houston cop shot dead on Gulf Freeway https://nypdholyname.com/houston-cop-shot-dead-on-gulf-freeway/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:14:03 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/houston-cop-shot-dead-on-gulf-freeway/ A Houston police officer was shot and injured Wednesday in an exchange of gunfire with a man during a traffic stop, authorities said. Chief Troy Finner said two HPD officers carried out a traffic stop around 11:20 a.m. in the 14300 block of the Gulf Freeway near Astoria in front of an Exxon gas station. […]]]>

A Houston police officer was shot and injured Wednesday in an exchange of gunfire with a man during a traffic stop, authorities said.

Chief Troy Finner said two HPD officers carried out a traffic stop around 11:20 a.m. in the 14300 block of the Gulf Freeway near Astoria in front of an Exxon gas station.

On HoustonChronicle.com: Uncle of 4-year-old boy accidentally shot in Katy arrested for possession of weapons, sheriff says

The officers, members of the department’s road interdiction unit, asked the person to get out of his vehicle. The person exchanged a few words with the officers, got out and “immediately started shooting” at the two officers, Finner said.

The officers – both 10-year veterans – returned fire, hitting the man repeatedly. One officer was shot in the pelvic area, Finner said, and also sustained a minor chest injury. The other officer was not injured.

“Thank goodness for his ballistic vest and flashlight,” Finner said. “It probably saved his life.”

The man shot dead by police is believed to be in critical condition, Finner said.

He had been the subject of a narcotics investigation by a multi-jurisdictional task force that included the Harris County Sheriff’s Office, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Harris County Constable’s Office 5 and the Department of Texas Public Safety.

Authorities had an active warrant for the man’s arrest, Finner added, and said he was out on $100,000 bond.

Finner, who arrived at the hospital in his uniform after having to hastily leave a cadet graduation in North Houston earlier in the day, said he spoke with the injured officer, who he said he was “in a good mood”.

“His wife, children, family and friends are shaken,” he said, “but he will be fine.”

Authorities have yet to name the shooter or the officers who shot him. Finner and other police officials said the injured officer was a 10-year veteran who worked in the Traffic Police’s Highway Interdiction Unit. The man’s colleagues said he came from a law enforcement family, with a recently retired father and a brother who also works for the department.

At the gas station and convenience store, an unmarked police car and an HPD patrol car are positioned next to a truck parked near one of the gas pumps. A car service station is nearby.

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“I thought what I heard were firecrackers,” added Mike Cho, who works at the auto service station, as soon as the shots rang out police were already converging on the scene.

Garrett Germany, 30, whose daily 4-mile cycling route to work takes him along the Gulf Freeway service road, said he was ‘shocked’ by the scene he encountered on the way back on Wednesday.

“You don’t really see that kind of crime here at this particular location,” Germany said, adding that the area just inland where the incident happened is largely residential. “It’s a low-key area.”

The shooting will be investigated, per department policy, by the Harris County District Attorney’s Office, Finner’s own investigators and the Internal Affairs Division.

This is the 15th shooting between police and members of the public this year, Finner said.

“Every time someone hurts someone in our city, I get upset,” he said. “But I am very upset about what is happening in our nation, our state and our county.”

He lamented the rise in gun violence at home and abroad and defended the actions of his officers.

“What can we do when people are shooting at us and putting us in this position?” he said.

The chief praised officers for “immediately” providing first aid to the man, as well as another officer for transporting his injured colleague to hospital. As he has often said in past shootings, he expressed frustration with the record of gun violence in Houston and elsewhere.

In recent months, the task force has focused on combating an influx of drugs containing fentanyl, Pct said. 5 Chief Deputy Brian Harris, whose department works alongside HPD within the group.

Law enforcement and harm reduction groups have reported a flood of drugs tainted with fentanyl, a synthetic opioid first used in medical settings but has become popular among illegal drug producers due to its extreme power.

In recent years, authorities have noticed fentanyl being added to many types of drugs, from methamphetamine to cocaine.

“It’s a Harris County-wide problem,” he said.



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Ex-Miami Beach police officer sues department over sexual harassment allegations https://nypdholyname.com/ex-miami-beach-police-officer-sues-department-over-sexual-harassment-allegations/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:24:01 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/ex-miami-beach-police-officer-sues-department-over-sexual-harassment-allegations/ MIAMI BEACH, Florida. – Jessica Salabarria Guasto was a police officer in Miami Beach for 10 years. She says that from the start of her career, she was sexually harassed. Now she has filed a federal lawsuit against the Miami Beach Police Department. “I have to fight for the right thing and that’s why I’m […]]]>

MIAMI BEACH, Florida. – Jessica Salabarria Guasto was a police officer in Miami Beach for 10 years.

She says that from the start of her career, she was sexually harassed. Now she has filed a federal lawsuit against the Miami Beach Police Department.

“I have to fight for the right thing and that’s why I’m going to keep fighting,” Guasto said. “I noticed there was a toxic culture there and it was allowed. They targeted women.

She said she was harassed by another officer and at one point showed pornographic films in her supervisor’s office. This led her to file equal employment opportunity complaints in 2018, 2020 and 2021.

“It’s a serious problem,” Guasto said. “I know there are a lot of women who don’t want to come forward because they’re afraid of retaliation.”

In 2020, Guasto got in trouble for driving his patrol car out of city jurisdiction. City sources said she was at her apartment complex when she was supposed to be working.

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“I knew they were going to do whatever they had to do to get me fired,” Guasto said.

She signed a settlement agreement where she paid back more than $3,000 to the city and dropped the equal employment opportunity lawsuit. She says what she did is not a dismissable act.

“All I ever wanted was a fair chance to be a police officer,” Guasto said.

She said that after this incident, she was forced into midnight, where one night her supervisor was a man who allegedly sexually harassed her in the past.

City sources said Guasto’s lawsuit was frivolous.

“They say that to every victim,” was his reply.

Those same sources said Guasto had consensual sex with the officer she accuses of sexual harassment.

“I didn’t,” she said boldly. “It’s a lie. They will do anything to discredit the victims.

Guasto was hacked by this officer for, among other things, dereliction of duty and not listening to police radios.

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She says that’s also a lie, though city sources say she’s the one not telling the truth.

The city implemented his resignation letter.

Guasto had dreamed of being a police officer since she was a child, and all she wants is to get her job back.

Copyright 2022 by WPLG Local10.com – All rights reserved.

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Prichard police officer charged with domestic assault faces new charges https://nypdholyname.com/prichard-police-officer-charged-with-domestic-assault-faces-new-charges/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 22:40:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/prichard-police-officer-charged-with-domestic-assault-faces-new-charges/ MOBILE, Ala. (WALA) – A Prichard police officer and his girlfriend, who accuses him of assaulting her, exchange new allegations. Markell Anthony Carter, 28, faces four new charges – second-degree domestic violence/witness intimidation; third degree domestic violence/harassment; violate an abuse protection order; and make a false complaint to the police. He was taken to the […]]]>

MOBILE, Ala. (WALA) – A Prichard police officer and his girlfriend, who accuses him of assaulting her, exchange new allegations.

Markell Anthony Carter, 28, faces four new charges – second-degree domestic violence/witness intimidation; third degree domestic violence/harassment; violate an abuse protection order; and make a false complaint to the police. He was taken to the Metropolitan Mobile County Jail on Friday afternoon.

It was unclear Friday whether Carter was staying on the Prichard force.

Mobile County prosecutors have asked a judge to revoke Carter’s bail in the original domestic violence case, in which he is accused of assaulting Tonesha Doucette and pointing a gun at her. Defense attorney Scott Hawk reckoned on Friday asking the judge to order Doucette to explain why she violated a no contact order.

Doucette, who filed for an abuse protection order, wrote in a court filing that Carter punched her on the back of the head and back and pulled her hair on April 17. This happened almost a month after the previous one. incident.

“He threw me out of the bed he pinned me to,” she wrote. “He grabbed a knife after he finished beating me.”

Doucette added that Carter put the knife on a chest of drawers and pushed her out the back door and wouldn’t let her get her things.

But Hawk told FOX10 News that Doucette was the attacker and that she went to her client’s home despite an order from Mobile County District Judge George Zoghby ordering her and Carter to to stay away from each other.

“The motion is pretty clear, crisp and dry,” he said.

Hawk said that was precisely the outcome he warned of when he asked the judge in March for a no-contact order against Doucette. He said at the time that he thought she was trying to induce his client to have his bail revoked.

“If he was arrested, I don’t see why she doesn’t get arrested. … I feel like my guy is a victim at this point,” he said.

Hawk said he plans to present evidence of property damage and physical injuries to Carter.

Mobile County Chief Assistant District Attorney Keith Blackwood told FOX10 News that a no contact order against a victim is not enforceable.

“The court does not have jurisdiction over the victim to order no contact,” he said. “The judges will order this to try to defuse the situation.”

Blackwood said prosecutors generally don’t object, but he added: ‘We should argue whether the court has jurisdiction to hold a victim in contempt when they have no jurisdiction to order a restraining order. -contact in the first place.”

Hawk said he disagreed with this legal interpretation.

“He’s not the judge,” he said. “The judge can make that decision.”

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Trial of ex-Lauderhill police officer set for closing arguments on Thursday – Sun Sentinel https://nypdholyname.com/trial-of-ex-lauderhill-police-officer-set-for-closing-arguments-on-thursday-sun-sentinel/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 21:49:10 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/trial-of-ex-lauderhill-police-officer-set-for-closing-arguments-on-thursday-sun-sentinel/ LAUDERHILL – A former Lauderhill police officer admitted on the stand Wednesday that he sometimes used a false name to identify himself on his cellphone and that he used discretion while allowing the woman at the center of the case to drive off despite the offences. offences. Jamar Lee, the ex-officer, is accused of demanding […]]]>

LAUDERHILL – A former Lauderhill police officer admitted on the stand Wednesday that he sometimes used a false name to identify himself on his cellphone and that he used discretion while allowing the woman at the center of the case to drive off despite the offences. offences.

Jamar Lee, the ex-officer, is accused of demanding sexual favors from Sierra Parrish in the early morning hours of February 25, 2020, after meeting her in a drive-thru lane at a Dunkin Donuts in Lauderhill around 3am trying to access Wifi. Parrish was 22 and homeless at the time and living in his car. Parrish and prosecutors claim that Lee, after discovering that the car’s registration had expired and Parrish’s driver’s license had been suspended, was willing to let her go in exchange for sexual favors.

Lee said he did not prosecute Parrish because she was only guilty of misdemeanors and was in a different jurisdiction.

Among the central issues of the case are Lee using a fake first name with Parrish, not activating his body camera when interacting with Parrish, and not telling dispatchers about their encounter. Prosecutors Justin McCormack and Lindsay Carrier told Judge Daniel Casey that these actions show Lee was trying to keep the meeting secret.

Defense attorney Johnny McCray said Parrish lied about meeting Lee because she wanted money. Parrish admitted on Tuesday that she was looking into a $300,000 civil lawsuit against Lee and Lauderhill.

Lee testified that he never made sexually suggestive comments to Parrish, never said he liked the way he looked, never turned his flashlight on his dress, and made a supportive comment while ‘she was looking for her driver’s license in the back of her car and had never guided it. hand to her crotch, everything Parrish testified to happened when she spoke on Tuesday.

Lee said he planned to allow Parrish to leave his car with his mother instead of having it towed, and that’s why they were driving with him in the lead and her following.

Prosecutors presented a series of witnesses from the Lauderhill Police Department who testified that Lee did not turn on his body camera during his interaction with Parrish and did not report his location to be dispatched during his interaction with Parrish.

When asked if he should have turned on his body camera, Lee replied that he doesn’t always use it.

“I stop and talk to people all the time,” Lee said.

Lee admitted that he sometimes uses the name “Justin” sometimes instead of his real first name when dealing with the public. He said he did it for his protection and that of his family. He said that sometimes people seek revenge against officers or their family members.

Lee, who said Parrish told him a long and sad story about having a fight with her boyfriend that night, being kicked out of her house by her mother and being in dire financial straits , also said he didn’t want to leave a young woman alone at 3 a.m., so he chose to “escort” her to a place to leave her car.

Closing arguments are scheduled for Thursday.

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