Civilian police – NYPD Holy Name http://nypdholyname.com/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 21:28:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://nypdholyname.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-47-120x120.png Civilian police – NYPD Holy Name http://nypdholyname.com/ 32 32 Two children died in police crash in Northern Brunswick https://nypdholyname.com/two-children-died-in-police-crash-in-northern-brunswick/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 22:18:36 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/two-children-died-in-police-crash-in-northern-brunswick/ Canton of North Brunswick The Attorney General’s office is investigating a fatal vehicle collision on November 25 in Northern Brunswick. According to the attorney general’s office, two children suffered fatal injuries. The identities of the deceased are not disclosed at this time. According to the preliminary investigation, the fatal incident occurred on November 25 at […]]]>

Canton of North Brunswick

The Attorney General’s office is investigating a fatal vehicle collision on November 25 in Northern Brunswick.

According to the attorney general’s office, two children suffered fatal injuries. The identities of the deceased are not disclosed at this time.

According to the preliminary investigation, the fatal incident occurred on November 25 at 11:35 p.m. at the intersection of Route 1 and Route 130 in Northern Brunswick. Two vehicles were involved in a collision.

The investigation revealed that the first vehicle was driven by a civilian driving on the wrong side of the road and also contained two children.

According to the investigation, the second vehicle was an identified Old Bridge Police Department vehicle driven by an Old Bridge Constable, which contained a second Old Bridge Constable and a civilian.

The two children in the civilian vehicle died from injuries sustained in the accident. Both officers and the civilian inside the police vehicle were injured.

This investigation is being conducted in accordance with Attorney General’s Directive 2019-4, which implements the legal requirement that the Attorney General’s office conduct an investigation into any death that occurs during an encounter with a law enforcement officer. order that acts in an official capacity or while the deceased is in custody and that establishes clear standards and procedures for conducting such investigations.

Pursuant to Section II.H.3 of the directive, the investigation will be bifurcated, with the Attorney General’s Office investigating the conduct of officers involved in the collision and the Middlesex County Attorney’s Office investigating the conduct of any other party that may be responsible.

The investigation is ongoing and no further information is provided at this time.


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🌱 Storm damage + Civilian police training + Military history https://nypdholyname.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-storm-damage-civilian-police-training-military-history/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 22:17:32 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-storm-damage-civilian-police-training-military-history/ Get on, Westhampton-Hampton Bays! It’s Sunday, so let’s start with everything you need to know about Westhampton-Hampton Bays today. Saturday’s storms resulted in widespread tornado warnings and damage in eastern Suffolk County. Southampton Town Police want to give residents the chance to ride with officers for the day. First, the weather forecast for the day: […]]]>

Get on, Westhampton-Hampton Bays! It’s Sunday, so let’s start with everything you need to know about Westhampton-Hampton Bays today.

Saturday’s storms resulted in widespread tornado warnings and damage in eastern Suffolk County. Southampton Town Police want to give residents the chance to ride with officers for the day.


First, the weather forecast for the day:

Partial sunshine. High: 51 Low: 36.


Here are the best stories in Westhampton-Hampton Bays today:

  1. The Hamptons were among the areas of Long Island subject to a tornado warning on Saturday. Pity was widespread. (News 12)
  2. News 12 reminds us that it is the last day to enjoy Long Island Restaurant Week. Union Sushi & Steak in Southampton has a marinated skirt steak inside a sushi roll, called Union Roll, which also has lobster and avocado inside and a famous bao bread with a barbecued pork loin and crispy onions. (News 12)
  3. Never asked what historical military vehicles do you see around the Hamptons? East Hampton VFW Post 550, Dayton-Soehlke-Ohlhorst Veterans Memorial VFW 5350 substation at Westhampton Beach and Francis S. Gabreski Air National Guard Base in Westhampton Beach all have pieces of history that you can see and read. (Dan’s papers)
  4. The Southampton City Police Department will be running a civilian academy program from January 26. The academy will run for 14 weeks, one evening a week, from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Southampton City Police Headquarters in Hampton Bays.. Classes will cover: Arrest, Search and Seizure Laws, Use of Force, Drunk Driving, Drug Enforcement, Domestic Violence, Investigations and Gangs. Students have the opportunity to ride with police on duty and attend a demonstration at the police gun stand and emergency vehicle operations course. (RiverheadLOCAL)

Today in Westhampton-Hampton Bays:


Westhampton-Hampton Bays Patch Book

  • Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, December 2, 6 to 9 p.m. First Annual Holiday Walk: Adults-Only Shopping Night, food and a live dueling piano show. (Facebook)

From our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!

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You are all caught up for today! See you tomorrow morning for your next update. If you like these newsletters, consider bringing friends and neighbors on board. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Jackie

Got a tip or suggestion for an upcoming Westhampton-Hampton Bays Daily? Contact me at WestHampton-HamptonBays@Patch.com.


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Mayor-elect Eric Adams hides possibility of civilian police commissioner – Oakland News Now https://nypdholyname.com/mayor-elect-eric-adams-hides-possibility-of-civilian-police-commissioner-oakland-news-now/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 22:44:17 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/mayor-elect-eric-adams-hides-possibility-of-civilian-police-commissioner-oakland-news-now/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCPRdFZ9hII Oakland News Now – Mayor-elect Eric Adams considers possibility of civilian police commissioner – video produced by the YouTube channel with the logo at the top left of the video. OaklandNewsNow.com is the original blog post for this type of video blog content. Mayor-elect Eric Adams reflects on what is arguably one of his […]]]>

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCPRdFZ9hII

Oakland News Now –

Mayor-elect Eric Adams considers possibility of civilian police commissioner

– video produced by the YouTube channel with the logo at the top left of the video. OaklandNewsNow.com is the original blog post for this type of video blog content.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams reflects on what is arguably one of his most important appointments – could New York City have a Civilian Police Commissioner? It appears to be a …

Going through IFTTT

Note from Zennie62Media and OaklandNewsNow.com: This video blog post shows the full, live operation of the latest updated version of an experimental network of Zennie62Media, Inc. mobile multimedia video blogging system that was launched in June 2018 This is an important part of Zennie62Media, Inc.’s new and innovative approach to news media production. What we call “the third wave of media”. The uploaded video is from a YouTube channel. When the CBS New York News YouTube video channel uploads a video, it is automatically uploaded and automatically formatted on the Oakland News Now site and on social media pages created and owned by Zennie62. The overall goal here, in addition to our is the on-scene reporting of news, interviews, sightings and events anywhere in the world and in seconds and not hours – is the use of the network existing YouTube social. graphic on any subject in the world. Now the news is reported with a smartphone and also by promoting the current content on YouTube: no heavy and expensive camera or even a laptop is needed, nor to have a camera crew to film what is already. on Youtube. The secondary objective is the production and distribution of news media content faster and very inexpensively. We have found that there is a lag between the length of the post and the production time and revenue generated. With this the problem is much less, but by no means solved. Zennie62Media is constantly striving to improve the system’s network coding and is looking for interested multimedia content and technology partners.

Oakland News Now Recent Stories

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Oakland News online links to Oakland’s only news aggregator blog

Oakland News Now Archives


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A judge likely to block the law prohibiting civilian police surveillance https://nypdholyname.com/a-judge-likely-to-block-the-law-prohibiting-civilian-police-surveillance/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 16:45:49 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/a-judge-likely-to-block-the-law-prohibiting-civilian-police-surveillance/ A judge told lawyers on Tuesday he would likely rule that a new Arizona law that bars a majority of civilians from serving on police oversight committees is unconstitutional. But Maricopa County Superior Court Judge John Hannah said he was unlikely to overturn the entire state budget bill containing the police oversight provision. which was […]]]>

A judge told lawyers on Tuesday he would likely rule that a new Arizona law that bars a majority of civilians from serving on police oversight committees is unconstitutional.

But Maricopa County Superior Court Judge John Hannah said he was unlikely to overturn the entire state budget bill containing the police oversight provision. which was contested by the City of Phoenix.

The law went into effect on September 29 and prevents Phoenix from appointing a director for its new police oversight office. Phoenix is ​​also challenging a portion of the Criminal Justice Funding Bill that expands an existing law that allows a single lawmaker to request an attorney general investigation of city or county laws.

The city alleged that the Republican-controlled legislature violated provisions in the state’s constitution that require all bills to cover a single topic and that their titles reflect the content of the bill. The disputed parties were neither described in the title nor related to the subject of the criminal justice budget bill, the city said.

“The very likely outcome is that there will be something for everyone,” Hannah said. “I think the legislation violates the one subject rule, but I’m not inclined to strike down the whole bill, just the parts that the city challenged.”

Hannah said a decision was imminent, possibly by the end of the day. His comments came at the start of a brief hearing in which he questioned lawyers about the details of handling a claim for legal fees.

The judge’s announcement of the expected ruling comes just a week before the Arizona Supreme Court hears arguments in a fast-track case involving four other laws that are part of the 11-bill budget package passed by the legislature in June.

Another judge blocked provisions in three of these budget bills because those elements were not identified in the title of the bill and declared another completely void because it violated the rule of the constitution requiring that the bills cover only one subject. These rules were designed to prevent lawmakers from “logrolling” or compiling a mishmash of policy provisions into one bill and forcing lawmakers opposed to one party to support the bill while limiting knowledge of the bill. audience or debate.

Judge Katherine Cooper’s Sept. 27 ruling prevented several parts of the budget package from going into effect as planned on Sept. 29, including a state ban on local school mask warrants and bans on other local restrictions. COVID-19.

The Arizona Supreme Court has accepted the state’s direct appeal and will hear the case on November 2.

The legislature in the Hannah case is considering targeted civilian oversight offices and boards that Phoenix and other cities are creating to strengthen police accountability.

Republican lawmakers acted after Phoenix created a new “Accountability and Transparency Office” designed to be headed by a civilian to provide independent oversight of the Phoenix police. The new ordinance passed in May also created a civilian oversight board to review police actions and policies.

The city ordinance prohibited any current or former Phoenix police officer from serving as office manager or serving on the supervisory board.

The legislature included provisions in the state budget criminal justice budget bill requiring that at least 2/3 of any supervisory board be certified police officers working for the agency qu ‘it regulates. Phoenix maintains that this completely destroys the independence of the new accountability office.

The city also challenged a provision in the same budget bill that allows any lawmaker to request an attorney general investigation of “any written policy, written rule, or written regulation adopted by an agency, department or other county entity, city ​​or town ”.

The provision is an extension of an existing law known as SB1487 that penalizes local governments by withholding their state-shared revenues if they pass ordinances in conflict with state laws. Cities and counties derive a large portion of their income from sales and income taxes collected by the state.

“Regardless of everyone’s stance on police surveillance and SB 1487, these amendments deserved the proper (and constitutional) consideration of our legislature,” according to the city’s complaint.

Burying them in a massive budget bill covering eight topics and 28 sections violated the state’s constitutional mandate that bills must be debated and passed on their merits, Phoenix lawyer Jean-Jacques wrote. Cabou.

State attorney Patrick Irvine told the court in his response that the city did not have the right to sue and the issue was political in nature and not up to the courts. Irvine also said the provisions were legitimately related to “criminal justice” and that a more detailed title was not needed.

Justice Hannah summoned Irvine and Cabou on Tuesday to discuss how he might deal with the attorney’s fee claim in the case if he now issues a ruling allowing the parties to ask the Supreme Court to review his decision. The state and city agreed to let the attorney fees issue wait for the other case to be resolved by the High Court.

If the Supreme Court upholds Cooper’s and expected Hannah’s decision, it will have far-reaching ramifications for the GOP-controlled legislature.

Lawmakers have long ignored the constitutional requirement that finance bills deal only with spending items, instead of wrapping them with unrelated policy items. This year, the majority Republicans have been particularly aggressive, but that would no longer be possible.


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SFU PhD student to advise U.S. jurisdictions on civilian police oversight – SFU News https://nypdholyname.com/sfu-phd-student-to-advise-u-s-jurisdictions-on-civilian-police-oversight-sfu-news/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 16:46:58 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/sfu-phd-student-to-advise-u-s-jurisdictions-on-civilian-police-oversight-sfu-news/ 2021 is a year of firsts for former Chief Civilian Director of the Independent Investigations Office of British Columbia, Richard Rosenthal. in the USA Undertaking premieres is not unusual for Rosenthal. He began his career with the youngest prosecutor in Los Angeles at the age of 23, obtaining his JD (Juris Doctor degree) to practice […]]]>

2021 is a year of firsts for former Chief Civilian Director of the Independent Investigations Office of British Columbia, Richard Rosenthal. in the USA

Undertaking premieres is not unusual for Rosenthal. He began his career with the youngest prosecutor in Los Angeles at the age of 23, obtaining his JD (Juris Doctor degree) to practice law at the University of California, Berkeley in 1986. He was the first director of the Portland Independent Police Review Division, served as the first police comptroller for the city and county of Denver and was selected to become the first chief civilian director of the Independent Investigations Office ( IIO) from British Columbia.

After his wife fell ill and passed away in 2015, Rosenthal took the time to think about what he wanted in his life. Knowing that his own father obtained his doctorate at the age of 50, Rosenthal realized that it was not too late for him to pursue his own doctorate.

Leaving his position at the IOI a few months earlier to pursue a doctorate in SFU’s criminology program, Rosenthal knew that the transition to student status could be a bit difficult. Considering his early career, he had not been a student for 30 years, and here he was starting master’s courses to earn credits for the doctoral program. While he admitted he had a lot to learn, he also had as much, if not more experience than some of his instructors as a teacher, lecturer, and assistant professor in some of his previous roles.

“I remember the first day I walked into class,” says Rosenthal, “I came straight home from work and was dressed in a suit and tie. All of my classmates were in their twenties and they were clearly wondering why a guest speaker was present for the first class.

Rosenthal continues: “I was also worried because I was already well known in this area and I made decisions that ended up generating negative publicity. We were trying to change an integrated policing culture within the IOI and a lot of people were fired as a result. I was worried that the students would not accept me because they might be concerned about my reputation in the media.

Despite all his concerns, Rosenthal was treated well by students and teachers alike. He was able to bridge the age gap with the students in his program and not only learn from his teachers, but also be treated like a peer in some ways. His supervisor, David McAllister, was the perfect fit for his research.

Rosenthal is grateful for the help of his masters classmates (who helped him through some quantitative aspects of the program) as well as his teachers and, of course, his family. Her two young adult sons and her fiancé were essential in helping her complete her thesis. His sons ran the house and farm and one of them helped visualize his data. His new fiancé drove him to back-to-back meetings in Seattle to gather his dissertation data before the border closed.

He’s busier now than when he worked full time with the IOI. He gets up early in the morning to take care of his chickens, spends the afternoons and weekends tending to his beehives and his lavender field and as the oldest recruit (55 years old) of the Mission fire department, responds to fire calls anytime of the day and night. Its lavender is sold to local florists, but its “liquid golden” honey is only for family and friends.

His doctorate not only adds credibility to his advice, but also helps create a niche for the services he offers. He is now the only person with a doctorate in North America with experience in setting up multiple civilian oversight agencies.

With the recent attention paid to minority police deaths in recent years, Rosenthal’s research on civilian oversight models, the experience of establishing and managing the IOI in B.C. , understanding US criminal law, policing and criminal procedures, he stands ready to advise US jurisdictions on the implementation of these important initiatives.

“Managing risk to the people and communities served by the police is at the heart of my activities. Models of civilian oversight, when implemented and operated properly, have the potential to save lives. “

This is why Rosenthal has now begun to consult with Washington State on how to create and manage the first independent critical incident investigation agency in the United States, with the aim of building police confidence in the within the community, reduce the risk of police using lethal force and ultimately save lives.


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Violent schizophrenic spat on civilian policeman and sent threat message https://nypdholyname.com/violent-schizophrenic-spat-on-civilian-policeman-and-sent-threat-message/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/violent-schizophrenic-spat-on-civilian-policeman-and-sent-threat-message/ A VIOLENT man spat at a civilian employee at Bury Police Station and then sent him a threatening email message. Manchester Minshull Street court heard how paranoid schizophrenic Brian Watson was arrested and held in police station cells on February 24, 2019, but when detention officer Janet Flynn opened a hatch to hand him food […]]]>

A VIOLENT man spat at a civilian employee at Bury Police Station and then sent him a threatening email message.

Manchester Minshull Street court heard how paranoid schizophrenic Brian Watson was arrested and held in police station cells on February 24, 2019, but when detention officer Janet Flynn opened a hatch to hand him food , he spat in her face.

He was charged with assaulting her, but two days later Ms Flynn received an email from Watson at her business address.

“Its content sought to rationalize what he had done and said the allegation was ridiculous,” prosecuting Rachel Faux told court.

Then on March 8, 2019, Watson sent another email to Ms Flynn and her colleagues demanding compensation and expenses.

“The email was not addressed to him by name but was threatening and said: ‘Whether or not you pay me the compensation, lives will be lost on your end for the crimes you have committed.”

In a victim impact statement read out in court, Ms Flynn said: “While these offenses may seem trivial by Crown Court standards, this case has had a significant impact on me.

“I was aware of Watson’s criminal history, which is littered with cases of threatening behavior and spontaneous acts of violence.”

The court heard that, over a two-year period, Watson, with no fixed address, had not received appropriate medication for his unstable mental condition and that he had committed a number of violent offenses.

The first happened in Oldham on October 14, 2017, when three 13-year-old schoolchildren were on an evening bus heading to the city center.

“As they approached the bus station, they saw the accused yelling, ‘get down’ while pointing a pistol at the head of a second man who was crouched on the sidewalk,” he said. said Miss False.

When the boys got home, a relative called the police and at 10:05 p.m., officers found Watson in a downtown cemetery.

A CCTV operator spotted him acting suspiciously and he was arrested. He was wearing a woolen cap with eye holes to create a balaclava and, searching a nearby flowerpot, the police recovered an air pistol loaded with pellets.

Watson, 32, homeless, told police he was suffering from hallucinations.

Judge Bernadette Baxter learned that Watson had committed other offenses as well, attacking a PCSO in downtown Rochdale on October 5, 2018 and possessing an ax at McDonald’s in Rochdale on March 9, 2019. He pulled out the gun from her scabbard and stroked it, causing the departure of a frightened family, seated at a nearby table.

On the way to the police station, he became aggressive, telling a policeman, “You need to cut your head with a rusty blade” and punching another in the face after he managed to escape the handcuffs.

Two months later, on April 29, Watson turned violent when a member of the public objected to his fishing for coins from the fountain in St Ann’s Square, Manchester, pointing out that the money was intended for Arena bomb victims.

Two policemen on leave intervened and asked him to return the 26p he had in hand, but he refused and became violent and assaulted them.

Watson pleaded guilty to possession of a firearm with intent to instigate fear of violence, multiple assaults, possession of an ax in public, theft, sending a threatening message and failure to attend court.

Helen Longworth, defending, said Watson was ultimately held at Forest Bank Prison on December 11, 2019 before being transferred, a year later, to the secure psychiatric facility at Edenfield Center.

Judge Baxter has heard from psychiatrists that he has made good progress and is now more stable on medication, with plans to better support him once he is released into the community.

“He has improved considerably from the appalling state he was in when he committed these offenses,” said Dr Simon Plunkett.

Judge Baxter has sentenced Watson to a section 37 hospital order of the Mental Health Act, where he will stay until doctors deem he is well enough to be released.


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Ontario Civilian Police Commission confirms dismissal of Durham police officer https://nypdholyname.com/ontario-civilian-police-commission-confirms-dismissal-of-durham-police-officer/ Mon, 27 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/ontario-civilian-police-commission-confirms-dismissal-of-durham-police-officer/ Ontario Civilian Police Board approves dismissal of Durham police officer after a number of alleged incidents. Agent Ian Cameron was dismissed from his post in January 2020 and appealed unsuccessfully. He had previously been convicted of two counts of misconduct. In September 2015, Cameron reportedly answered a call at someone’s house while he was visibly […]]]>

Ontario Civilian Police Board approves dismissal of Durham police officer after a number of alleged incidents.

Agent Ian Cameron was dismissed from his post in January 2020 and appealed unsuccessfully.

He had previously been convicted of two counts of misconduct.

In September 2015, Cameron reportedly answered a call at someone’s house while he was visibly under the influence of alcohol. He took a breathalyzer, breathed over 80 years and was quickly arrested.

Years earlier, in 2009, Cameron allegedly threatened another officer with a gun. The court found that he had placed the cannon in the abdomen of the other officer, under his protective vest.

He pleaded guilty to the firearm incident and received an absolute discharge. This ultimately earned him a two-year demotion from first class to second class constable. During this period, the 2015 incident occurred.

Cameron was also found guilty of insubordination. In August 2015, he allegedly texted a sergeant, accusing him of being part of a plot to spy on him (comparing him to the East German Stasi). The court heard that in another text he said he wanted to fight with an inspector.

In its decision of September 17, the commission supported the dismissal of Cameron.

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Windsor Police Respond to Recommendations One Year After Ontario Civilian Police Board Report Released https://nypdholyname.com/windsor-police-respond-to-recommendations-one-year-after-ontario-civilian-police-board-report-released/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/windsor-police-respond-to-recommendations-one-year-after-ontario-civilian-police-board-report-released/ A year after the Ontario Civilian Police Commission called on the Windsor Police Service and Commission to address a number of systemic issues, including racial diversity and low representation of women in the service, the police officers explain in detail how they reacted. In the report included in the agenda for Thursday’s police council meeting […]]]>

A year after the Ontario Civilian Police Commission called on the Windsor Police Service and Commission to address a number of systemic issues, including racial diversity and low representation of women in the service, the police officers explain in detail how they reacted.

In the report included in the agenda for Thursday’s police council meeting and submitted to the OCPC on August 6, police officials say they have completed 26 of the 37 recommendations and detail how they plan to complete the rest of the recommendations by 2022, while noting that “considerable progress” has already been made. carried out on these outstanding points.

The report said the OCPC investigation and its recommendations had forced the service and the board to “look at the way business was conducted.”

“The initiatives and policies that subsequently emerged have long-term reach and have the capacity to change the culture of the Windsor Police Service for the betterment of our members and the community,” the report states.

The board held a public online meeting on Thursday to discuss the report, but only talked about the 79-page update for about five minutes.

Frank Providenti, the service’s deputy operations chief, spoke to CBC News after the meeting and said it had been “a lot of work,” but that they are adhering to the recommendations.

“What we’ve learned is that we need to work together to figure out what needs to be done to create a better workplace to listen to people and make positive change,” he said.

Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkens, who is also the chairman of the police board, was unavailable for an interview on Thursday.

WPS Deputy Chief of Operational Support Frank Provident told CBC News they are consulting with their agents as they continue to make changes. Consultants organized public meetings, surveys and one-on-one discussions. (Jennifer La Grassa / CBC)

Investigation launched after several complaints

The OCPC report, first released in August 2020, was completed after a two-year investigation into the service following a number of complaints from members raising serious concerns about the work environment .

Some of the concerns cited “inappropriate interference in specific legal proceedings”, allegations of a “poisoned work environment” and transparency in the hiring and promotion process.

The investigation was also expanded to include how a 911 call was handled at the home of former Windsor Police Chief Al Frederick in November 2018. The call and investigation were first reported. by CBC News, several months after the incident, citing concerns about the lack of transparency by police departments.

At the time, the commission, which is an independent oversight body under the Police Services Act, made recommendations regarding racial diversity, the low representation of women in police services and the need for greater transparency in the process of hiring chiefs and deputy chiefs.

He also underscored the need to improve policies on how chiefs and deputy chiefs investigations are handled.

The Windsor Police Service says 26 of the OCPC’s 37 recommendations have been completed so far. (Chris Ensing / CBC)

The report presented to the police commission on Thursday says the service has hired outside consultants, including a team that specializes in equity, diversity and inclusion and another that specializes in communications, to help bring about change within of the force.

According to the report, the department is still in the process of hiring an employee review initiative consultant to improve the promotion process and address equity and diversity issues.

Taken measures

Here are some of the other key actions outlined in the report in response to the recommendations:

  • The service has updated its conflict of interest policy to make it clear if and when certain cases should be referred to an external body for investigation, and what the protocol is when an investigation involves someone like the police chief. .
  • In response to the OCPC’s recommendation to the service to reassess its promotion process, the Service Promotion Process Advisory Committee should provide direct input during promotions and re-evaluate the process annually.
  • The service proposed the removal of seniority as a rating category during the promotion process, and this was approved by the Police Association as it can be a barrier to recruitment and promotion, especially in this regard. which concerns racial diversity and the representation of women.
  • A strategy is being developed to increase diversity and recruit women to the service headed by the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Coordinator.
  • Development of education and training on stigma regarding accommodation, implementation of online human rights training and training on harassment offered to new employees.
  • In response to the task of improving its management of workplace harassment, the guidelines surrounding the process have been amended.

Here’s some of what’s still in the works:

  • Implementing a “field-tested and legally defensible” promotional process to address equality and diversity within the service. The service is still working on selecting a third-party vendor to develop it, but it should be completed by March or April of next year.
  • Efforts to address the under-representation of sworn-in female officers in the service are still ongoing, but the goal is to create a strategic plan for recruiting women and candidates who “represent the diversity of the community”. It should be finished by October.
  • Efforts to assess and promote morale in the workplace are still ongoing, but are expected to be completed by next month. An internal consultation survey has been launched and the development of a communication strategy is underway.

Thursday’s agenda also included an email from Thomas Lockwood, outside counsel for the Ontario Civilian Police Commission, acknowledging receipt of the report submitted by Chief of Police Pam Mizuno.

“The service and the board are to be commended for their efforts,” Lockwood wrote in response.

While they are on track to implement all of the recommendations, Providenti said the job won’t end once all of the changes are made.

“This is an ever-changing situation, just don’t stand still and follow these recommendations and say OK, we’re done,” he said.

“You have to reassess every year. You need to review all of your policies every year and take into consideration what works and what doesn’t. Some things may not work and you may need to reassess, but you have to listen to the members. ”


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Civilian Police Supervisory Board publishes its findings https://nypdholyname.com/civilian-police-supervisory-board-publishes-its-findings/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/civilian-police-supervisory-board-publishes-its-findings/ However, the agency only resolved 22 of those complaints, up from 104 resolutions during the same period in 2019. “Honestly, he struggled from the start to keep up with the number of complaints,” said Pat Davis, a member of city council. “And I think that’s what this report tells us, is that we’re still struggling.” […]]]>

However, the agency only resolved 22 of those complaints, up from 104 resolutions during the same period in 2019.

“Honestly, he struggled from the start to keep up with the number of complaints,” said Pat Davis, a member of city council. “And I think that’s what this report tells us, is that we’re still struggling.”

The agency’s executive director, Edward Harness, cited a staff shortage and COVID-related adjustments as reasons for the low number of resolutions.

He also mentioned the fact that two of his investigators spent hundreds of hours investigating complaints related to the metro protests last summer.

“One of the investigators spent over 500 hours reviewing video of these incidents,” Harness said. “And another investigator spent 300 hours reviewing the video.”

The report also mentions recommended ODA policy changes.

CPOA board chairman Eric Olivas said they had proposed two, circling the backhand camera video and the department’s air support unit.

“One of the great advantages of these backside cameras is that they give us really pretty definitive proof of what happened, what was said, what was not said,” he said. Olivas said. “And they can really help us determine if a complaint is valid or if a policy has been violated.”

The agency asked the DPA to keep the setback video longer and to ban officers from reviewing the video before their first statements. He also asked the police to use the video to analyze policies and find trends in policing. As for the air support unit, the council asked the police to measure the effectiveness of the unit and determine whether its funding benefits officers and the public.

“A lot of times I think it boils down to a policy or training issue,” Olivas said. “Where there isn’t a good policy in place or there is a training problem, the policy that is in place.”

The agency has already looked at figures for the first half of 2021 and said it has already closed 67 investigations.

Harness said the agency is expected to be fully staffed with four investigators by October.


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Registration opens for the Civil Police Academy of the Winthrop Police Department https://nypdholyname.com/registration-opens-for-the-civil-police-academy-of-the-winthrop-police-department/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/registration-opens-for-the-civil-police-academy-of-the-winthrop-police-department/ For immediate release WINTHROP – Chief Terence M. Delehanty is pleased to announce that residents can now enroll in the Winthrop Police Department Civilian Police Academy this fall. This free program is open to residents of Winthrop aged 18 and over. Classes will be held Thursdays, October 14 to December 30, 6:30 p.m. to 9 […]]]>
For immediate release

WINTHROP – Chief Terence M. Delehanty is pleased to announce that residents can now enroll in the Winthrop Police Department Civilian Police Academy this fall.

This free program is open to residents of Winthrop aged 18 and over. Classes will be held Thursdays, October 14 to December 30, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Winthrop Police Department. Classes will not be held on Thanksgiving or Christmas week.

Various members of the Winthrop Police Department will conduct classes in their areas of expertise during the 10 classes. Topics will include domestic violence, police exploration, motor vehicle law, patrol procedures, accidents, firearms, critical incidents, implicit bias, gangs, minors, as well as application, prevention and treatment of narcotics. Participants will have the opportunity to watch a ride in the company of a Winthrop police officer.

“The goal of this course is to bring community members to the station and give them a clear picture of what it’s like to be a police officer, and we encourage anyone interested in the law enforcement to apply, ”said Chief Delehanty. “Participants will learn a lot about all aspects of police work and will leave with a true representation of the life of an officer.

Residents are requested to drop or post a application at the Winthrop Police Department, 3 Metcalf Square. Requests sent by mail should be addressed to Lieutenant Stephen Rogers. For those who prefer to complete the application virtually, please click on here.

Residents will be notified by email if they have been accepted into the class. The course is limited to 20 participants.

The Winthrop Police Department will conduct a background check on applicants to determine their acceptance into the academy.

For more information, please contact Lt. Rogers by emailing srogers@town.winthrop.ma.us or calling 617-846-1212 ext 2940.

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