Civilian police – NYPD Holy Name http://nypdholyname.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:52:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nypdholyname.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-47-120x120.png Civilian police – NYPD Holy Name http://nypdholyname.com/ 32 32 Lagos PRO police dress up as civilians; Police officers at checkpoints ask him “something” https://nypdholyname.com/lagos-pro-police-dress-up-as-civilians-police-officers-at-checkpoints-ask-him-something/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:52:03 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/lagos-pro-police-dress-up-as-civilians-police-officers-at-checkpoints-ask-him-something/ Lagos State Police Public Relations Officer Benjamin Hundeyin conducted a social experiment by dressing up as a civilian and driving around 11:50 p.m. through police checkpoints. Hundeyin said he went through the first and second checkpoints, adding that his “papers weren’t even asked for”. Hundeyin attempted to emphasize how to behave with police officers on […]]]>

Lagos State Police Public Relations Officer Benjamin Hundeyin conducted a social experiment by dressing up as a civilian and driving around 11:50 p.m. through police checkpoints.

Hundeyin said he went through the first and second checkpoints, adding that his “papers weren’t even asked for”.

Hundeyin attempted to emphasize how to behave with police officers on the road in a polite manner, saying, “Respect is mutual,” adding that people should not be unnecessarily aggressive as he was overtaken at a checkpoint after having smiled.

Hundeyin shared his experience on the road with police via his verified Twitter handle on Thursday evening, where he revealed that officers asked him to give them “something”.

He tweeted: “Finally realized my social experiment. I drove around Ikeja around 11:50 p.m., as a mufti, in a private car. I went through two police stations. I spent five seconds on the first floor without a word from the policeman. He simply motioned for me to continue.

“I spent thirty seconds to the second. Officer: Are you Uber? Me no. It’s my personal car. Officer: Find me something na. Me: I don’t understand anything. Officer: See how well you are. Find me something na. Me: (pause). Officer: Oya, go ahead.

“On both occasions, as soon as I was flagged down, I turned on the cabin light and rolled down the window on my side. I greeted first. On top of that, in the second scenario, I smiled and deliberately looked friendly.

“Note: They didn’t recognize me; I didn’t identify myself either. It never came to that. The papers were not even requested. I’m sure there are plenty of people with similar experiences out there. Different shots for different people, I know. One thing is certain though.

“Respect is mutual. Appreciate those who are there all day and all night for less pay. Don’t be condescending. Don’t be unnecessarily aggressive. Also don’t be docile. Always be firm with your rights. And don’t try to do yourself justice.

“There is no utopia anywhere. Report the few rotten eggs and we will continue to do the internal cleaning. Thought to share my social experience. I’ll tinker with the variables next time.

He added, however, that this was not to invalidate or trivialize the bad experiences of some motorists and commuters. “Absolutely not,” he stressed.

Reacting to him, popular ENDSARS activist Rinu Oduala said that Hundeyin was trying to show that police harassment did not exist, saying it was because the PPRO had never experienced police brutality from his life.

“You are not a youngster struggling to make a living in Nigeria. You are a police PRO who has never known brutality in his life but needs to show that police harassment does not exist.

“This planned PR is failing, Oga Hundeyin. Go and re-strategize,” she replied in a tweet.

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SWAT draws attention of civilian police review board for playing Miley Cyrus music https://nypdholyname.com/swat-draws-attention-of-civilian-police-review-board-for-playing-miley-cyrus-music/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 16:38:11 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/swat-draws-attention-of-civilian-police-review-board-for-playing-miley-cyrus-music/ 306 and above. That’s the number of complaints filed since July 11, when the Columbus Civilian Police Review Board officially began accepting complaints from citizens about alleged police misconduct. The Sussi report investigated more than a third of the complaints. The allegations range from civil rights violations and excessive force to police helicopters flying too […]]]>

306 and above.

That’s the number of complaints filed since July 11, when the Columbus Civilian Police Review Board officially began accepting complaints from citizens about alleged police misconduct.

The Sussi report investigated more than a third of the complaints. The allegations range from civil rights violations and excessive force to police helicopters flying too low and a SWAT vehicle playing pop music through loudspeakers.

Here are a few that caught our attention.

  • A woman claims an officer knocked her mother to the ground when she approached the officer while officers were arresting her son. The woman states that her mother injured her back from the push. The daughter claims that her brother suffered from a “psychotic episode due to drugs”.

  • The man claims an officer stopped his vehicle and searched it. He claims that when he was allowed to leave, he noticed that his wallet, which he said was in the center console of the car, was missing.

  • Officers called a woman’s home regarding a child protective services case. The woman claims the officers ‘treated her very aggressively and believe it was due to her race’. The woman, according to the complaint, is biracial.

  • The man alleges that an officer in a marked vehicle traveling 80 to 90 mph south of I-71 turned on its lights and conductive tailgates. He says it happens every day, and he has video evidence.

  • The woman says officers, including helicopter officers, are harassing, tracking and accessing her cell phone and hacking into her internet. She states that she has received death threats and that the Columbus police say she will kill her family. The report says the woman contacted the Division’s Office of Internal Affairs with similar complaints.

  • The man claims that two officers are committing crimes in his name and stealing his mail.

  • Officers arrived at the scene at an apartment. The complaint does not explain the nature of the appeal. The resident says an officer “picked up my dog ​​and threw him on the crate” because the dog growled at the officer’s K-9. The dog’s owner says it was excessive force even though he says his dog ‘didn’t sustain any injuries’.

  • Reverend McIntosh (no first name given) claims there is a “dirty cop dating club” in the west side of town where officers waterboard. The reverend also claims that officers are “filming her because of a (legal) lawsuit she filed with the city three years ago.”

  • The man claims officers carried out an illegal traffic stop due to “racial bias”.

  • A woman claims officers strip searched her at Ohio Health because she is Muslim. The report says the woman was in the hospital for an appointment and spent two weeks in the “psychiatric ward”.

  • A person claims a SWAT vehicle sped past their house with Miley Cyrus music blaring from the intercom speakers. He says it’s “inappropriate”.

Miley Cyrus

Nate Simon, the board’s executive assistant, recounts The Sussi report that when they receive a complaint, it is entered into their case management system and reviewed by the Inspector General or Deputy Inspector General of the Commission “to determine whether the complaints fall within our jurisdiction“.

Complaints that pass this first hurdle indicate that Simon is then assigned to an investigator to review the complaint, interview witnesses, and verify body-worn camera video.

Following the investigation, the case is presented to the Civilian Police Review Board for review and recommendations.

The recommendations of the Commission are only advisory insofar as the Commission does not have the power to sanction an officer. The Columbus Police Division Office of Internal Affairs will investigate these cases and refer them to Chief Elaine Bryant and Director of Public Safety Robert W. Clark for review and possible sanction.

Two veteran CPD detectives who spoke with The Sussi report say they don’t trust the Commission or the process.

“Hell no,” the detective said. “They won’t look at the facts; it will be politically motivated. That’s all. They get arrested and want revenge on the officer in any way possible. When we prove them to be lying, will they recommend that charges be brought against them? Hell no!”

Another detective we spoke to says Council members aren’t qualified to investigate or make recommendations.

“You have a group of individuals with no police training in tactics, use of force, etc.” he explained. “And they’re going to review these things and make decisions?”

Simon tells The Sussi report that some cases are nearing completion and will be presented to the Commission at its next meeting on October 4. The meeting will take place from 2-5 p.m. at 111 N. Front St., Room 204.

If you have a tip, you can leave me a message at 614 779-1185 or email me at tom@thesussireport.com.

Please support local businesses that support Free Press and The Sussi Report.

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New civilian police oversight plan includes changes to composition and accountability https://nypdholyname.com/new-civilian-police-oversight-plan-includes-changes-to-composition-and-accountability/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 22:02:35 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/new-civilian-police-oversight-plan-includes-changes-to-composition-and-accountability/ A new ordinance that would create a civilian body to oversee the Richmond Police Department includes changes that have drawn criticism from criminal justice reform advocates and the City of Richmond Democratic Committee. Mayor Levar Stoney and four council members introduced new legislation on Monday to create a civilian review board, replacing legislation he introduced […]]]>

A new ordinance that would create a civilian body to oversee the Richmond Police Department includes changes that have drawn criticism from criminal justice reform advocates and the City of Richmond Democratic Committee.

Mayor Levar Stoney and four council members introduced new legislation on Monday to create a civilian review board, replacing legislation he introduced in March and withdrew in July.

The eight-member council – supported by a full-time staff member appointed by the city council – would review police shootings, as well as other injuries or deaths that occurred while people were in custody. The group would then make a report or recommendation to the Chief of Police, Mayor and City Council.

“This new proposal reflects a collaborative effort with members of city council and I greatly appreciate their critical insight,” Stoney said in a news release Monday. “The result is a CRB that will be equipped to meet the needs of our community, provide accountability and improve public safety for all Richmond residents.

The biggest change in the new legislation from the plan withdrawn in July concerns membership. Current legislation includes an eight-member council: four appointed by the mayor and four by the city council. Previous legislation included one member appointed by the chief of police, three appointed by the city council, and three by the mayor.

Eli Coston, co-chair of a task force appointed to explore possibilities for the civilian review board, tweeted Tuesday that the even number of seats on the board would make it less effective.

“Some of the changes will actually make the CRB less effective (8 members with a failed tie vote, higher percentage of votes for a subpoena). They don’t want surveillance.” coston wrote.

Even with the changes, the board would not be able to issue a subpoena and would have to apply for one at Richmond Circuit Court. The new legislation requires six – instead of the five votes previously requested – to address the court.

The council would be able to review all department investigations of police shootings, serious injury or death in police custody, accusations of physical and verbal abuse, and appeals of police findings. These investigations would only take place after a police investigation – but before discipline was imposed. The use of third-party investigators would depend on “the availability of sufficient funds”.

The council’s annual budget is estimated at $200,000.

“This proposal fails in a very specific way. The disciplinary authority, the final disciplinary authority under this document, is always the Chief of Police,” said RCDC Resolution Committee Chair Tom Barbour. “The problem with this is that right now we have a police chief who seems to be struggling to take responsibility for his own actions in the Dogwood Dell incident. I think this should make Council, the city and the people of Richmond think about whether this document will create an effective civilian review board.

The new legislation has several other notable differences: it removes a required period of residence in the City of Richmond in favor of current residence; no more than two council members may live in the same council district; and members – as well as their family members – cannot have any pending complaints or litigation against the police department.

The city council would also appoint a full-time staff member, who would prepare council-recommended policies and procedures. This staff member would serve at the pleasure of the Council, rather than being an employee assigned to the council by the Inspector General, who had previously expressed reservations about connecting the CRB to his office.

Two notable changes have been made to reporting. More importantly, the city’s chief executive will choose a third party to assess the council in the first year of the CRB. The council will also write an annual report to the mayor and council; the withdrawn legislation required the report to be submitted to the Chief of Police.

The mayor’s office did not immediately return a request for comment on this story.

The Civil Review Board legislation will be formally discussed at the city council’s public safety standing committee meeting on September 27.

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Akron City Council Puts Civilian Police Review Board Measure to Ballot | The sound of ideas https://nypdholyname.com/akron-city-council-puts-civilian-police-review-board-measure-to-ballot-the-sound-of-ideas/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/akron-city-council-puts-civilian-police-review-board-measure-to-ballot-the-sound-of-ideas/ Akron City Council held a special meeting yesterday to approve an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot creating a civilian police review board. If approved by voters, the measure would create a 9-member council that would advise on policing matters, including training and misconduct investigations. The push for the measure came after […]]]>

Akron City Council held a special meeting yesterday to approve an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot creating a civilian police review board. If approved by voters, the measure would create a 9-member council that would advise on policing matters, including training and misconduct investigations. The push for the measure came after the police shooting death in June of Jayland Walker, an unarmed black man.

Cleveland police are investigating after a Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority officer fatally shot and killed a man on Labor Day morning. Body camera footage taken by the officer shows he fired his gun after he was attacked and punched by a man on West 174th Street near Riverside Park. Footage shows the officer first tried to use his taser to subdue the man.

The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority will use Transit Ambassadors to assist riders and deal with situations that do not require armed police. Transit Ambassadors will be on Healthline buses and at RTA stations. They will help users navigate the transit system and will be called upon to defuse non-criminal situations that may arise on RTA vehicles.

With about two months to go until November’s general election, the last few weeks will be tough times for candidates. In Ohio, the headline midterm races will be for Governor and United States Senate and former President Trump weighs in on both races. Trump has announced he will hold a rally in Youngstown next week in support of Republican JD Vance. He also backed Mike DeWine in the gubernatorial race, which he didn’t do until the May primary.

Cedar Point says it’s the end of the line for Top Thrill Dragster. The ride was billed as the tallest and fastest in the world when it debuted 19 years ago. But the ride hasn’t been open since last August when a support fell off the ride and seriously injured a rider. The park says the coaster will be retired and a new, reimagined ride will be created to replace it.

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Civilian Police Review Board holds first meeting after 20-year-old man shot dead by CPD https://nypdholyname.com/civilian-police-review-board-holds-first-meeting-after-20-year-old-man-shot-dead-by-cpd/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 21:50:52 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/civilian-police-review-board-holds-first-meeting-after-20-year-old-man-shot-dead-by-cpd/ COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) – The City of Columbus Civilian Police Review Board has been fully operational for less than two months and it already has a big job to do. The board could recommend disciplinary action against the Columbus police officer who killed 20-year-old Donovan Lewis last week while serving a warrant. This is if […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) – The City of Columbus Civilian Police Review Board has been fully operational for less than two months and it already has a big job to do.

The board could recommend disciplinary action against the Columbus police officer who killed 20-year-old Donovan Lewis last week while serving a warrant. This is if it is determined that the officer was wrong.

The members of this council were appointed to their positions in 2021, but it did not become fully operational until July 11. Tuesday was their first meeting since the incident after CPD officer Rickey Anderson shot Donovan Lewis.

Since its commissioning, the Inspector General’s office, which is in charge of the council, has received 88 complaints about CPD officers. Inspector General Jacqueline Hendricks said 58 of them were closed because they were not deemed sufficient to continue or had nothing to do with DPC.

Only 30 of those 88 cases were investigated for misconduct, 27, or excessive use of force, 3. Now it’s still unclear to the council if any of those 30 complaints relate to the Lewis case, but from what was said at the meeting, they are aware that it is coming.

A big part of Tuesday’s meeting was to figure out how to proceed with these disciplinary hearings, how they will know if a complaint has already been filed or if it is from someone in good standing, and how long they have to proceed with a recommended punishment. . .

During the meeting, several board members used the Lewis case as an example to try to determine when the civilian review board will hold its hearings if there is also a criminal investigation involved.

“Again, just using the concrete examples of the three recent shootings, is there anything that, because this is a public hearing that we can’t just ask, is there -he had a complaint filed regarding Donovan Lewis,” board member Rich Nathan asked.

Hendricks said the board will not hold its hearings until a criminal investigation is conducted, if there is one, and that their side will focus primarily on administrative misconduct.

“What we would do is review the agent’s actions to see if their actions violated DPC’s policies and procedures. That would still be what our investigation would be. So it wouldn’t be investigating the criminal investigation, it would be their actions to see if their actions violate policy and procedure,” Hendricks said.

The inspector general said council will have 90 days to close the case from the day the complaint is filed, but extensions may be granted in certain situations. At this time, we do not know when the hearings for the Lewis case will take place.

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Akron City Council Calls Special Meeting to Put Civilian Review Committee on November Ballot | New https://nypdholyname.com/akron-city-council-calls-special-meeting-to-put-civilian-review-committee-on-november-ballot-new/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 21:32:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/akron-city-council-calls-special-meeting-to-put-civilian-review-committee-on-november-ballot-new/ Updated: 1:00 p.m., Wednesday, September 7, 2022 Akron residents will likely get a chance to vote on establishing a civilian police review board in November. The Summit County Board of Elections verified thousands of signatures on a petition compiled by advocacy groups including Freedom BLOC and Akron NAACP. State law requires the city council to […]]]>

Updated: 1:00 p.m., Wednesday, September 7, 2022

Akron residents will likely get a chance to vote on establishing a civilian police review board in November.

The Summit County Board of Elections verified thousands of signatures on a petition compiled by advocacy groups including Freedom BLOC and Akron NAACP.

State law requires the city council to now approve an ordinance placing the initiative on the ballot. The Board has scheduled a special meeting for Thursday, September 8 at 2 p.m. to formally put the amendment to the November 2022 ballot.

Akron advocacy groups, including the local NAACP chapter and Freedom BLOC, on Tuesday provided additional details of the proposed ballot initiative that would create a civilian oversight board.

The review board’s intent is to improve community and police relations and provide better oversight of Akron police, said Judi Hill, president of the Akron NAACP.

It would give community members more information about police procedures, training and misconduct investigations, she said.

“Our goal is very, very simple. (Give) all citizens of Akron the opportunity to participate, to be part of the process from start to finish,” Hill said.

Hill spoke alongside other community leaders, as well as elected officials and clergy, at a press conference at First Congregational Church in Akron.

Although a civilian review board has been in the works for years, the ballot initiative was sparked by the death of Jayland Walker, 25, an unarmed black man who was fatally shot by Akron police. in June.

More than 7,000 people have signed a petition to get the review board involved in the November ballot, Hill said. The proposal is a charter amendment, which means that if approved, it would be codified in the city’s charter.

The lawyers said a key part of the plan was to expand and strengthen the role of city police auditor, a position created in 2007 and currently held by Phillip Young.

The police auditor currently doesn’t have much power to influence change, Freedom BLOC executive director Ray Greene said at the press conference.

“The role does not have access to records and any complaints it receives must be forwarded to the police department for investigation. The current police auditor is currently barred from investigating any officers involved in misconduct,” Greene said.

There have also been staffing issues in the police auditor’s office over the years, Ward 8 Councilor Shammas Malik added.

The charter amendment would create a 3-person office with a full-time auditor, an assistant auditor and an assistant, he said. The Citizens Review Board would oversee the auditor with hiring and firing power.

“It is really crucial that the police auditor does not report directly and his job is not directly managed by the mayor or the council, because there may be times when he has to disagree with the mayor or the council. city ​​council,” Malik said.

The Citizens Review Board would not impose discipline or changes directly. While he would review internal misconduct investigations and offer perspective, Malik added that he would not conduct any investigations himself.

Malik acknowledged that the city may have to renegotiate its contract with the police union if the charter amendment passes.

“It can’t mean we tie our hands. It can’t mean we don’t pursue justice,” Malik said. “Contracts are renegotiated all the time.”

Meanwhile, Mayor Dan Horrigan announced last week that he plans to propose an ordinance to city council with a similar plan for a civilian review board.

Horrigan proposes an 11-member council all appointed by the mayor, while the community groups petition calls for a 9-member council with 3 appointed by the mayor and the remainder by the city council.

Proponents of the charter amendment believe their proposal is stronger and more inclusive. Hill said the mayor’s order did not focus on citizens.

“The mayor would select people, the mayor would suggest what their role was…and I thought, well, this is not a citizens’ review board. There’s nothing about the citizens involved in it,” Hill said.

Hill and others said they were surprised when Horrigan’s proposal was announced the same day petitions were delivered to the city clerk’s office.

“I don’t think they took our petition campaign very seriously maybe at first. I do not know. I don’t know if they thought we would be able to collect the signatures in time,” Hill said.

Another key difference is that Horrigan’s proposal is an ordinance, which means that if passed, the review board would not be immediately codified in the city charter. Charter amendments are superior to ordinances.

Copyright 2022 WKSU. To learn more, visit WKSU.
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Akron is evaluating 2 competing proposals for a civilian police review board. Here’s what you need to know | New https://nypdholyname.com/akron-is-evaluating-2-competing-proposals-for-a-civilian-police-review-board-heres-what-you-need-to-know-new/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 20:21:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/akron-is-evaluating-2-competing-proposals-for-a-civilian-police-review-board-heres-what-you-need-to-know-new/ There are now two different plans for an independent oversight board to oversee citizen complaints from the Akron Police Department. Depending on City Council’s actions over the next few weeks, Akron voters will know whether they will decide on the review board next year or as early as November. Akron residents have been calling for […]]]>

There are now two different plans for an independent oversight board to oversee citizen complaints from the Akron Police Department. Depending on City Council’s actions over the next few weeks, Akron voters will know whether they will decide on the review board next year or as early as November.

Akron residents have been calling for a civilian police review board for years, but the recent police shooting of an unarmed black man, 25-year-old Jayland Walker, has brought it to the forefront. citizens and elected officials.

Two different options have recently emerged: a charter amendment drafted by community groups that could be voted on in the November election and an ordinance from the mayor’s office that will be considered by the Akron City Council in September.

Members of local groups, including Freedom BLOC and the Akron NAACP, delivered more than 7,000 signatures on a petition to the city clerk’s office on Tuesday. If it makes the vote and is approved by voters, the review committee would become part of the official city charter.

Meanwhile, Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan also announced on Tuesday that he plans to propose a

order to city council next month. Horrigan’s proposal, if passed, would create the review board but would not immediately codify it into the city charter. The order specifies that the ultimate goal is to submit a charter amendment to voters in November 2023, according to the document.

Lack of time for the modification of the charter

For the Community Groups Vote initiative to be added to the ballot, 2,678 of the 7,000 signatures collected must come from registered Akron voters, or 10% of the number of voters who participated in the last municipal elections, a said Bill Rich, President. of the Summit County Board of Elections.

The Board of Elections will review the signatures in the coming days and the City Council Clerk is verifying that the initiative meets the requirements of the City Charter.

If everything passes, the city council must call a meeting to officially put the charter amendment on the ballot, Rich said.

The meeting should take place by September 9 for the initiative to qualify for the November 2022 general election, he said. If the council does not meet in time, there will have to be a special election specifically for the ballot measure – which would not happen until January 2023 at the earliest.

“That’s why there’s some time pressure here,” Rich said.

The city council’s next regular meeting is on September 12, when they are due to consider Horrigan’s proposal.

Rich is also a professor emeritus of law at the University of Akron and offered perspective on several possible outcomes that could occur depending on the council’s actions in the coming weeks.

If the city council doesn’t hold a meeting by Sept. 9 and a special election is forced, it could impact voter turnout, he said.

“It definitely affects turnout, and it can be confusing for some voters,” Rich said. “People aren’t used to voting in January…there will be people who run in the general election in November who don’t run in a special election in January.”

Moreover, it will cost more to hold another election just a few months after the general, he added.

“At the end of the day, the ratepayers and the City of Akron will end up…paying more for this than if it had been voted on in November,” Rich said.

If the city council passes Horrigan’s ordinance — and the charter amendment ends up voting and also passes — the ordinance would need to be changed so that it adheres to the charter amendment, he said. he declares.

“An ordinance cannot trump the city charter,” Rich said. “There would be conflicts between the ordinance and the charter.”

The boards offered are similar, but not exactly the same

The two proposed review boards are similar, but there are key differences, Rich added. The two review boards would review citizen complaints against the police, issue recommendations on how the department can improve, offer feedback on trainings and focus on community engagement.

In the charter amendment, the review board can conduct its own investigations into potential police misconduct, if there is the support of at least two-thirds of the board.

The mayor’s proposal clarifies that while the council will review complaints, all investigations will be conducted internally by the Akron Police Department or assigned to state or federal authorities. Investigations would then be reviewed by the council once completed.

One of the biggest differences is the number of board members and how they would be appointed.

In the citizens’ vote initiative, the council would consist of nine members – three appointed by the mayor and six by the city council. Members would be required to come from a variety of backgrounds, and some must specifically have worked in areas related to mental health, criminal justice and law enforcement.

Mayor Horrigan proposed an 11-member review board, all appointed by the mayor with the consent of city council. The proposal calls for some members to have training in criminal justice, racial equity and law enforcement. Members are expected to attend the police service‘s Citizens’ Academy and complete 40 hours of “company walks” with officers.

Another key difference is that the mayor’s proposal creates a new department, the Office of Inspector General, which would review the laws and procedures of the police department and other city employees.

The charter amendment outlines an Office of the Independent Police Auditor, which would review police practices. Akron currently has one police auditor, Phillip Young. The amendment does not specify whether the current police auditor would fill the new position that would be created.

Both review panels would be required to issue regular reports on their actions and recommendations.

If the review board initiative passes, the wording of the ballot presented to voters — a short and precise summary of the charter amendment — still needs to be written, Rich added. Either the city council can draft the proposed wording or the board of elections will create it, he said.

Copyright 2022 WKSU. To learn more, visit WKSU.
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Akron is evaluating 2 competing proposals for a civilian police review board. Here’s what you need to know https://nypdholyname.com/akron-is-evaluating-2-competing-proposals-for-a-civilian-police-review-board-heres-what-you-need-to-know/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 20:21:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/akron-is-evaluating-2-competing-proposals-for-a-civilian-police-review-board-heres-what-you-need-to-know/ There are now two different plans for an independent oversight board to oversee citizen complaints from the Akron Police Department. Depending on City Council’s actions over the next few weeks, Akron voters will know whether they will decide on the review board next year or as early as November. Akron residents have been calling for […]]]>

There are now two different plans for an independent oversight board to oversee citizen complaints from the Akron Police Department. Depending on City Council’s actions over the next few weeks, Akron voters will know whether they will decide on the review board next year or as early as November.

Akron residents have been calling for a civilian police review board for years, but the recent police shooting of an unarmed black man, 25-year-old Jayland Walker, has brought it to the forefront. citizens and elected officials.

Two different options have recently emerged: a charter amendment drafted by community groups that could be voted on in the November election and an ordinance from the mayor’s office that will be considered by the Akron City Council in September.

Members of local groups, including Freedom BLOC and the Akron NAACP, delivered more than 7,000 signatures on a petition to the city clerk’s office on Tuesday. If it makes the vote and is approved by voters, the review committee would become part of the official city charter.

Meanwhile, Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan also announced on Tuesday that he plans to propose a
order to city council next month. Horrigan’s proposal, if passed, would create the review board but would not immediately codify it into the city charter. The order specifies that the ultimate goal is to submit a charter amendment to voters in November 2023, according to the document.

Lack of time for the modification of the charter

For the Community Groups Vote initiative to be added to the ballot, 2,678 of the 7,000 signatures collected must come from registered Akron voters, or 10% of the number of voters who participated in the last municipal elections, a said Bill Rich, President. of the Summit County Board of Elections.

The Board of Elections will review the signatures in the coming days and the City Council Clerk is verifying that the initiative meets the requirements of the City Charter.

If everything passes, the city council must call a meeting to officially put the charter amendment on the ballot, Rich said.

The meeting should take place by September 9 for the initiative to qualify for the November 2022 general election, he said. If the council does not meet in time, there will have to be a special election specifically for the ballot measure – which would not happen until January 2023 at the earliest.

“That’s why there’s some time pressure here,” Rich said.

The city council’s next regular meeting is on September 12, when they are due to consider Horrigan’s proposal.

Rich is also a professor emeritus of law at the University of Akron and offered perspective on several possible outcomes that could occur depending on the council’s actions in the coming weeks.

If the city council doesn’t hold a meeting by Sept. 9 and a special election is forced, it could impact voter turnout, he said.

“It definitely affects turnout, and it can be confusing for some voters,” Rich said. “People aren’t used to voting in January…there will be people who run in the general election in November who don’t run in a special election in January.”

Moreover, it will cost more to hold another election just a few months after the general, he added.

“At the end of the day, the ratepayers and the City of Akron will end up…paying more for this than if it had been voted on in November,” Rich said.

If the city council passes Horrigan’s ordinance — and the charter amendment ends up voting and also passes — the ordinance would need to be changed so that it adheres to the charter amendment, he said. he declares.

“An ordinance cannot trump the city charter,” Rich said. “There would be conflicts between the ordinance and the charter.”

The boards offered are similar, but not exactly the same

The two proposed review boards are similar, but there are key differences, Rich added. The two review boards would review citizen complaints against the police, issue recommendations on how the department can improve, offer feedback on trainings and focus on community engagement.

In the charter amendment, the review board can conduct its own investigations into potential police misconduct, if there is the support of at least two-thirds of the board.

The mayor’s proposal clarifies that while the council will investigate complaints, all investigations will be conducted internally by the Akron Police Department or assigned to state or federal authorities. Investigations would then be reviewed by the council once completed.

One of the biggest differences is the number of board members and how they would be appointed.

In the citizens’ vote initiative, the council would consist of nine members – three people appointed by the mayor and six by the city council. Members would be required to come from a variety of backgrounds, and some must specifically have worked in areas related to mental health, criminal justice and law enforcement.

Mayor Horrigan proposed an 11-member review board, all appointed by the mayor with the consent of city council. The proposal calls for some members to have training in criminal justice, racial equity and law enforcement. Members are expected to attend the police service‘s Citizens’ Academy and complete 40 hours of “company walks” with officers.

Another key difference is that the mayor’s proposal creates a new department, the Office of Inspector General, which would review the laws and procedures of the police department and other city employees.

The charter amendment outlines an Office of the Independent Police Auditor, which would review police practices. Akron currently has one police auditor, Phillip Young. The amendment does not specify whether the current police auditor would fill the new position that would be created.

Both review panels would be required to issue regular reports on their actions and recommendations.

If the review board initiative passes, the wording of the ballot presented to voters — a short and precise summary of the charter amendment — still needs to be written, Rich added. Either the city council can draft the proposed wording or the board of elections will create it, he said.

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Public opinion sought on the draft ordinance for the supervision of the civilian police https://nypdholyname.com/public-opinion-sought-on-the-draft-ordinance-for-the-supervision-of-the-civilian-police/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 16:53:46 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/public-opinion-sought-on-the-draft-ordinance-for-the-supervision-of-the-civilian-police/ By the city of Santa Barbara The City of Santa Barbara is seeking comments on a draft ordinance that will guide its efforts in implementing a new police department civilian oversight system. The order is an important step towards strengthening accountability and transparency. This is a historic effort and the City’s first collaboration with the […]]]>

By the city of Santa Barbara

The City of Santa Barbara is seeking comments on a draft ordinance that will guide its efforts in implementing a new police department civilian oversight system. The order is an important step towards strengthening accountability and transparency. This is a historic effort and the City’s first collaboration with the community in policing.

“The City strives for transparency and accountability in its operations, and community input is essential to making these efforts successful,” said Barbara Andersen, Senior Assistant to the City Administrator. . “It is extremely important that we hear from you at this stage of the process and throughout the implementation of the new civilian oversight system. »

The draft ordinance elevates and assigns new police oversight duties to the five-member longtime Fire and Police Commission. Among its new functions, the Commission will receive reports containing data on the number and type of internal and external complaints received and subsequent action taken, including the number of officers disciplined and the level of discipline imposed. The Commission will also review and discuss with the Chief of Police, in open session, individual investigations when they become disclosable under the California Public Records Act. Additionally, the Commission will receive submissions from the Chief of Police regarding any officer-involved shootings once the agency conducting such an investigation determines the findings.

The draft order also prioritizes community participation and engagement as a key part of building understanding of what our law enforcement officers face every day to ensure the safety of our residents and visitors to the city of Santa Barbara. This includes rigorous training for commissioners as well as more opportunities for community input and education about policing practices in Santa Barbara.

In addition to soliciting public comment, over the next few weeks City staff will be engaging with various community members and organizations to gather feedback on the draft.

To view the draft ordinance, visit: SantaBarbaraCA.gov/CommunityOversight

The City welcomes all ideas, questions and concerns to be shared during this time. Public comments can be directed to FPOrdinance@SantaBarbaraCA.gov. The deadline for public comments to be presented to the Orders Committee is September 20, 2022.

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Have your say on Santa Barbara’s draft ordinance for civilian police oversight | Local News https://nypdholyname.com/have-your-say-on-santa-barbaras-draft-ordinance-for-civilian-police-oversight-local-news/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://nypdholyname.com/have-your-say-on-santa-barbaras-draft-ordinance-for-civilian-police-oversight-local-news/ Posted on August 24, 2022 | 9:41 a.m. The City of Santa Barbara is seeking comments on a draft ordinance that will guide its efforts in implementing a new police department civilian oversight system. The ordinance is a step towards strengthening accountability and transparency. A historic effort, this is the city’s first collaboration with the […]]]>

Posted on August 24, 2022
| 9:41 a.m.

The City of Santa Barbara is seeking comments on a draft ordinance that will guide its efforts in implementing a new police department civilian oversight system. The ordinance is a step towards strengthening accountability and transparency.

A historic effort, this is the city’s first collaboration with the community on police oversight.

“The city strives to be transparent and accountable in its operations, and community input is essential to making these efforts successful,” said Barbara Andersen, senior assistant to the city administrator. “It is extremely important that we hear from you at this stage of the process and throughout the implementation of the new civilian oversight system. »

To view the draft ordinance, go to SantaBarbaraCA.gov/CommunityOversight.

The draft ordinance elevates and assigns new police oversight duties to the five-member longtime Fire and Police Commission.

Among its new functions, the commission will receive reports containing data on the number and type of internal and external complaints received and subsequent actions taken, including the number of officers disciplined and the level of discipline imposed.

The commission will review and discuss with the chief of police, in open session, individual investigations when they become disclosable under the California Public Records Act.

Additionally, the commission will receive submissions from the police chief regarding any shootings involving an officer once findings are determined by the agency conducting such an investigation.

The draft order also prioritizes community participation and engagement as a key part of building understanding of what law enforcement faces on a daily basis to keep residents safe. and visitors in the city of Santa Barbara.

This includes rigorous training for commissioners, as well as more opportunities for community feedback and education on policing practices in Santa Barbara.

In addition to soliciting public comment, over the next few weeks city staff will be engaging with various community members and organizations to gather feedback on the draft.

The city invites all ideas, questions and concerns to be shared during this time. Public comments can be directed to [email protected] The deadline for public comments to be presented to the Ordinance Committee is September 20.

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